Laurie Foster | Open up the new tracks to wider community!

first_imgWith the official start of the 2019 local track and field season in early January, comes another synthetic track at the home of one of the major high schools competing for championships honours. The Jamaica College family should be lauded for following Calabar High and Kingston College into this new era where these first-class facilities are made available at this level. Smartly used, this innovation can be of inestimable value to not only the respective institutions, but also to the wider country. Jamaica, despite not enjoying the best of preparation platforms, has occupied an elite position in the world rankings of the sport. This is mainly in the area of the sprints where the McKenleys, Quarries, Otteys et al have led the way and stimulated a chasing pack to follow in their footsteps. The recent call is for athletes in other disciplines to be afforded the opportunity to rule the big stages. These recently constructed tracks, along with the facilities which accompany them, can provide an answer. SHARING RESOURCES That said, it will not be merely the existence of same that will bring about the extension of the athletes’ capabilities. A lot will depend on how much sharing is allowed to take place. For instance, the resident high schools should open up the usage to the wider community. This is not an easy sell as the question of meeting the costs of upkeep will arise. Although it can be a restrictive factor, it should not stand in the way of achieving what should ultimately be the aim, which is to have a positive outcome on the country’s image as a great track and field power. It should be a joint effort and not dependent solely on the schools’ initiative. This is where the Government enters the equation. Hand in hand with the private sector, it should form a partnership with the individual schools to cross that bridge. There should be a highly publicised programme to embrace the surrounding communities and let them feel that they are a part of the way forward. Proper management of the process will be key to the success which is envisaged. The required resources are of endless magnitude but it must be tackled in a way to maximise whatever is put into the project. It should, therefore, be borne in mind that it should not be seen at the end of the day as a waste of time and effort. Another crucial matter should be considered. There should be something of similar lines going on in the rural areas of the country. As the past informs us, this should not be a Kingston city matter alone. Jamaican sport has benefited from performances which had their birth in the countryparts. It would be unwise to ignore that as it is sought to enhance the urban model. It is instructive to note that the rural schools have borne the brunt of producing the best in recent times. It is for them simply a matter of not having the support to replicate the recent infrastructure development in the Kingston area. That, too, should be addressed. It is only a matter of finding the will to further encourage the nation’s chief contributor in this area. Let us go for it. Jamaica will be the ultimate winner. For feedback: email – lauriefoster2012@gmail.com www.facebook.com/lauriefosterlast_img read more

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NEB sets Trans Mountain hearings schedule to meet February deadline

first_img“The NEB’s hearing will be a comprehensive scientific and technical examination of project-related marine shipping,” said NEB chief environment officer Robert Steedman in a statement. CALGARY, A.B. – The National Energy Board has released a schedule that it says will allow it to reconsider its approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project in time to meet a Feb. 22 federal government deadline.The federal regulator is imposing filing deadlines starting this month, will hear oral traditional evidence by Indigenous groups in November and December, and will hear potential oral summary arguments in January.The plan to triple the capacity of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C., is in limbo while Ottawa, which now owns the pipeline, attempts to fulfil a court’s requirements to consult Indigenous communities and consider the environmental impact of additional oil tankers off the coast.- Advertisement -The federal government ordered the NEB to reconsider parts of Trans Mountain’s application related to marine shipping and appointed former Supreme Court justice Frank Iacobucci to oversee a new round of consultations with Indigenous communities.After gathering input from the public on two options earlier this month, the NEB says it will limit its consideration of project-related shipping to the area between the Westridge Marine Terminal and the 12-nautical-mile territorial sea limit, not to Canada’s 200-nautical-mile exclusive economic zone.It also corrected the number of approved interveners to 99, noting it had initially released an incorrect total of 98 on Oct. 5.Advertisementlast_img read more

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