Missed Final 4 goal haunts Vigil’s final year as Growling Tiger

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Vigil bid his UAAP stint goodbye on Saturday with Growling Tigers falling short to Ateneo, 74-64.READ: Ateneo survives UST, inches closer to twice-to-beatFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentHe wound up with 14 points before fouling out with 1:52 left in the game as UST stumbled to a 3-11 card, its worst record in the Final Four era.Describing UAAP Season 79 as an “emotional whirlwind” for him, Vigil found the best time to pour out all of his pent-up emotions on in his final game as a Growling Tiger. EDITORS’ PICK View comments 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Late run fuels La Salle past FEU We are young Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 UST captain Louie Vigil. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWith University of Santo Tomas ending its season on a whimper, Louie Vigil expressed discontent with how he finished his collegiate career.“Personally, syempre di ako kuntento kasi di kami nakapasok eh. Yun naman talaga ang goal ko kaya ako bumalik this season, para makabalik sa Final Four,” he said.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img MOST READ Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise “First half pa lang, parang kinakabahan na ako. Tinatanong ko ang sarili ko kung nagawa ko na ba ang lahat?Am I contented with this? There’s something in me na parang di ko nabigay lahat para sa UST community. There’s little bit of me din na sinasabi na tama na at nagawa ko na ang lahat,” he said.READ: Prized recruit Akomo brings hope to UST after forgettable seasonThough Vigil couldn’t hide his disappointment, he just hopes that this nightmarish season for the Growling Tigers can be a source of motivation for the holdovers next year.“Lagi kong sinasabi sa kanila na itanim nila sa puso’t isip nila yung nangyari ngayon para magkaroon sila ng extra fuel for them to be ready next year,” he said. “I’m confident na alam na nila ang dapat gawin, especially sa fourth kasi doon nagkakaroon ng lapses. Medyo minsan nakakadikit kami pero pag nag-run ang kalaban, sumusuko na. Sana may natutunan sila ngayong season na ito, di lang heartbreaks kundi learnings din.”“I’m rooting for them next year. They’ll be better next year, for sure, in terms of the standings.”ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modeslast_img read more

See More

Gorayeb eyes Lady Stags’ improvement more than sweep

first_imgSan Sebastian is three games away from sweeping its way to the NCAA Season 92 women’s volleyball finals, but coach Roger Gorayeb is far more concerned on getting his team improve in time for the playoff phase.“Yes we want to sweep, who wouldn’t want that,” said Gorayeb in Filipino. “But I want my team to improve on many aspects like defense and not relying too much on one player but play more as a team.”ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise EDITORS’ PICK Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town The Lady Stags have emerged the only unbeaten team after winning their first six outings and could advance straight to the best-of-three championship round if they could hurdle their last three assignments.San Sebastian’s last three games though will be against Final Four conteders Perpetual Help (3-2) on Jan. 13, Lyceum (4-1) on Jan. 23 and defending champion St. Benilde (5-1) on Jan. 25.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“Hard to think of a sweep early because we know our last three games are all strong teams,” said Gorayeb.There was some concern, however, about reigning back-to-back MVP Grethcel Soltones’ conditioning. MOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Mavs take control in third quarter, beat Lakers 101-89 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Senators to proceed with review of VFA Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. We are young Soltones has been far from peak form and is currently just second in the league’s best scoring as she averaged just 16.17 points a game, a shade behind last year’s Finals MVP and St. Benilde star Jeanette Panaga’s 17 hits.“I did my part, it will really be up to her (Soltones),” said Gorayeb.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View commentslast_img read more

See More

Bolivia’s Madidi National Park home to world’s largest array of land life, survey finds

first_imgA two-and-a-half-year biological survey of Madidi National Park in Bolivia added 1,382 species and subspecies of plants and animals to the list of those living in the park.The team believes that 124 species and subspecies may be new to science.WCS, the organization that led the study, said the 18,958-square-kilometer (7,320-square-mile) park is the world’s most biodiverse protected area. An expedition through the rainforests, mountains and grasslands of Bolivia’s Madidi National Park has turned up hundreds of species previously unknown in the park, including dozens that could be new to science.The two-and-a-half-year survey known as “Identidad Madidi” ended in late November on the slopes of Chaupi Orco, a mountain on the border of Bolivia and Peru. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), an NGO, said the results make Madidi “the world’s most biologically diverse terrestrial protected area.” They also provide the foundation for keeping the park’s ecosystems intact, WCS ecologist Robert Wallace said in a statement.“The massive amounts of images and data collected on the expedition will provide us with the baseline information needed to protect this natural wonder for future generations of Bolivians and the world,” added Wallace, who led the effort.A map of Madidi National Park in Bolivia. Image courtesy of WCS.The team’s transects, across the 18,958 square kilometers (7,320 square miles) of wilderness encompassed by Madidi National Park, added nearly 1,400 plant and animal species and subspecies to the park’s biological roster. For more than 200, it’s the first time scientists have recorded their existence in Bolivia. And the researchers also believe that 124 species and subspecies — of plants, butterflies, fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals — might have wholly escaped scientific notice until now.With these new, more extensive catalogs of biodiversity, WCS reports that Madidi now has more birds, butterflies, mammals and plants than any other park or preserve in the world. It holds the second spot for reptiles and amphibians, at least for right now, the organization said. Those numbers support WCS’s contention that Madidi is the world’s most biodiverse protected area on land.During the expedition, field researchers shared what they were finding with Bolivian media outlets and through Facebook and other social media channels. That ongoing communication appears to have had the intended effect, ecologist Lilian Painter, who heads WCS in Bolivia, said. A high Andean peak in the Apolobamba Mountains. Image by Milieniusz Spanowicz/Wildlife Conservation Society. A new snake species of the Dipsas genus. Image by Milieniusz Spanowicz/Wildlife Conservation Society. Article published by John Cannon A catfish of the Microglanis genus. Image by Milieniusz Spanowicz/Wildlife Conservation Society. A potentially new frog species of the genus Microkayla. Image by Milieniusz Spanowicz/Wildlife Conservation Society. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored 123456789101112 read more

See More

Extreme floods on the rise in the Amazon: study

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, agribusiness, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Drought, Amazon People, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Science, Crop Yields, Crops, Disasters, Extreme Weather, Flooding, Precipitation, Research, Rivers, Tropical Rivers Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Scientists and the media have documented deepening drought in the Amazon basin. But a new study finds that flood events are significantly intensifying too, becoming five times more common over the last century.The effect is caused by a combination of factors, including an increase in strength of the Walker circulation – an ocean-driven pattern of air circulation that carries warm moist air from the tropical Atlantic across South America towards the Pacific, resulting in Amazon precipitation.Human-driven climate change is a major contributing factor to this increased Amazon basin flooding. Intensifying flood events result in lives and property lost, and significant harm to croplands, pastures and livestock.A better understanding of flood and drought dynamics, and better predictability due partly to this study, could help reduce this damage. How escalating changes in precipitation occurrence and intensity might be altering Amazon flora and fauna is uncertain, though new research shows that tree species composition is altering. Flooding in the center of Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil in 2009. Image by Jochen Schöngart / National Institute for Amazon Research.While deepening droughts have made headlines in recent years, extreme floods have been steadily increasing in frequency and severity in parts of the Amazon basin, putting lives and livelihoods at risk. According to a new study, longer and more extreme floods are becoming increasingly common due to a combination of fluctuations in atmospheric circulation systems and human-driven climate change.Publishing in the Journal Science Advances, Jonathan Barichivich at the Universidad Austral de Chile and colleagues collated daily water level records from the Port of Manaus on the Rio Negro from 1903 to 2015, and from Óbidos on the Amazon mainstem from 1970 to 2015. They found that the frequency of severe floods in both locales has increased steadily since 1970. Together these stations measure flow for the whole of the upstream Amazon.“In the whole 20th Century, there hasn’t been floods as severe or as frequent as in the last decade,” says Barichivich. Meanwhile, droughts have intensified in parts of the Amazon. An increase in intense flooding, alternating with deeper droughts, is a finding in keeping with current global climate change models.River records are useful windows into the dynamics of large regions, as their levels are influenced by the water levels in all tributaries upstream and downstream of the measurement site. They are also among the longest ecological records available.The team identified 14 severe droughts and 14 severe floods in the Amazon since 1903. They used the Geological Survey of Brazil’s official critical water levels to define a severe flood in Manaus as one with levels higher than 29 meters (95 feet), and a severe drought as lower than 15.8 meters.Many people living in the Amazon basin rely on the river’s annual flooding cycle for agricultural crops and livestock grazing. But extreme floods can cause extensive agricultural and infrastructure damage. Image by Jochen Schöngart / National Institute for Amazon Research.The researchers also looked at the severity and duration of floods and found that extreme floods have tended to be higher and longer-lasting, with water levels over 29.7 meters (97.5 feet) for more than 70 days occurring once every 3 years, compared to once every 50 years in the 1900s.Average water levels at Manaus port have increased by 1 meter (3.3 feet) during the 113-year record, a rise caused by increased precipitation during the wet-season.Extreme flood events can have disastrous effects. Traditionally, as the Amazon basin wet season ends, the nutrient rich floodplains offer the perfect conditions for agricultural plantings and grazing livestock. But prolonged, severe flooding destroys these crops and pastures, contaminates water supplies, and cuts people off from their homes for weeks or months at a time. In May 2012, after months of torrential rain, water levels at Manaus port reached 29.7 meters (97.5 feet), their highest level on record, and remained above 29 meters for over 70 days. Large scale floods could potentially pose future threats to the structural integrity of Amazon dams.Flooding also alters sediment transport – an important process for downstream ecosystems, fisheries and farms – and carbon storage in plants, soils and peatlands.Using atmospheric circulation models coupled with real-world data, the team was able to link the increased Amazon precipitation driving these extreme flood events to an increase in the strength of the Walker circulation – an ocean-driven pattern of air circulation that carries warm moist air from the tropical Atlantic across South America towards the Pacific.Since the early 1970s, the Atlantic Ocean has been in a warming phase of a natural cycle called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which has been accelerated by human-caused climate change. However, in 1998 the Pacific Ocean entered a cooling phase of the Pacific Interdecadal Oscillation (PIO), increasing the temperature disparity between the two oceans. This temperature gradient is what drives the Walker Circulation, which supplies rain clouds to the central and northern Amazon basin.A diagram of the Walker circulation, showing the direction of wind circulation over the tropics. Since 1990, sea surface temperatures have warmed in the Atlantic, but cooled in the Pacific, driving warm, moist air from the Atlantic to rain more heavily, and more often, over parts of the Amazon. Image by Jonathan Barichivich.“The wet season was getting wetter in this period, while the Pacific was cool and the Atlantic was warming very fast,” says Barichivich. This pattern is mirrored in the Manuas port river records, he says, with more frequent extreme floods during the wet season and deeper droughts during the dry season. “The amplitude of this natural water level fluctuation started to increase… due to a combination of both anthropogenic climate change and natural variability.”Zed Zulkafli, a hydrologist at Universiti Putra Malaysia in Selangor, who was not involved in the study, praised the rigor of the data analysis based on the length of the river records, saying, “the novelty [of the study] is in … using long term records at Manaus that reveal the severity of recent floods… as well as in linking the Walker circulation to the increasing flood severity.”In addition to the AMOC and PIO, the Amazon flood cycle is subject to natural fluctuations caused by the osccilation between El Niño and La Niña extremes in the Pacific ­– linked to Amazon droughts and floods respectively, which explains why the devastating drought of 2010, which began as an El Niño year, happened despite a general trend towards higher precipitation..“The perception for most people is that droughts are the most important thing in the Amazon,” says Barichivich, but the century-long records at Manuas port show that “floods are outstanding in meteorological change” the Amazon has experienced.“Until the 1960s we had one [extreme] flood every 20 years more or less,” says Barichivich, but the average number has increased to one every four years since the early 2000s. Interestingly, the team failed to find a long-term trend in the frequency of droughts in the Amazon, with their average occurrence once every 5 to 12 years remaining relatively static throughout the record.Flooded suburb of the city of Itacoatiara in the Central Amazon in 2009. Image by Jochen Schöngart / National Institute for Amazon ResearchAs the Atlantic continues to warm faster than the Pacific, extreme floods look set to be a recurring feature of the Amazon basin. A 2016 study led by Zulkafli predicted a larger increase in wet-season rainfall compared to dry-season drought for the Peruvian Amazon basin by the end of the 21st Century. However, “the degree to which extreme flooding will become more frequent is more challenging to quantify,” she says.Within a decade or so, the study authors predict that the Pacific will move into a warming phase of the PIO, reducing the disparity in sea temperature between the Atlantic and Pacific and thus weakening the Walker circulation that carries rainfall to the Amazon Basin. This, Barichivich says, could slow the acceleration of extreme weather events over the Amazon. However, this effect will not be enough to reduce the frequency and intensity of extreme flooding to pre-1990 levels. “We think that [extreme] floods should still be a problem in the next coming decades,” Zulkafli says.“The biodiversity as well as the riverine communities along the Amazon and its tributaries have developed as a result of [the] Amazon flooding regime. And so they will be impacted by more frequent and prolonged flooding,” Zulkafli concludes.The authors hope their models will allow for more accurate predictions of annual Amazon flooding, allowing seasonal forecasts to take Walker circulation strength, and Atlantic / Pacific ocean conditions into consideration. This forecasting ability could save lives and property, aiding farmers and ranchers. It remains to be determined how more frequent, extreme flooding will impact plants and wildlife.Citation:Barichivich, E. Gloor, P. Peylin, R. J. W. Brienen, J. Schöngart, J. C. Espinoza, K. C. Pattnayak, Recent intensification of Amazon flooding extremes driven by strengthened Walker circulation. Sci. Adv. 4, eaat8785 (2018). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aat8785FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Many people living in the Amazon basin rely on the annual flooding cycle of the region’s rivers for transport and fishing. However, the increasing instability of precipitation cycles, largely driven by climate change, is making it harder to travel these waterways and utilize them in safety. Image by Jonathan Barichivich.last_img read more

See More

Borneo study explores links between farm expansion and deforestation

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Species, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Haze, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Slash-and-burn, Southeast Asia Haze, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Banner image: A baby orangutan. Orangutans are listed as Critically Endangered and on the brink of extinction as their habitats are destroyed by expansion of industrial plantations in Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. A nearly two-decade study of land-cover change in Borneo has identified a positive correlation between the loss of forests and the expansion of plantations, primarily for oil palms.The findings undermine the long-held position of industry and government representatives that plantation expansion doesn’t contribute to deforestation and that it makes use of already cleared land.The study also highlighted a slowdown in rates of both deforestation and plantation expansion, which the researchers attributed to declining process of crude palm oil, more stringent regulations on forest clearing, and wetter weather in 2017.While the expansion of plantations hit a new low in 2017, activists say the possible illegal clearing of peat forests continues unabated in Indonesian Borneo, despite repeated calls to the government for action. JAKARTA — A slowdown in both the expansion of industrial plantations and forest loss across Borneo in 2017 provides strong evidence of a correlation between the two.The findings are laid out in a new study by scientists at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), who used time-series satellite images to quantify forest loss, industrial plantation expansion and their overlap each year from 2000 to 2017 in Borneo. The island, home to half of the world’s oil palm plantations, is shared by Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei, but the study omitted the latter because of its negligible area of industrial plantations.The area of forest lost in the region studied amounted to 2,500 square kilometers (970 square miles) in 2017 — a sharp decline from the 2016 peak of 6,100 square kilometers (2,360 square miles).Also in 2017, industrial plantations expanded by 1,100 square kilometers (425 square miles) in Indonesian Borneo, also known as Kalimantan, and by 500 square kilometers (190 square miles) in Malaysian Borneo. These figures were markedly down from highs of 7,000 square kilometers (2,700 square miles) in Kalimantan in 2009, and 6,000 square kilometers (2,320 square miles) in Malaysian Borneo in 2012.CIFOR’s estimate of the total area of old-growth forest lost in Kalimantan and Malaysian Borneo from 2000 to 2017 is 60,400 square kilometers (23,320 square miles). The figure is strikingly close to the 62,000 square kilometers (23,940 square miles) of total industrial plantations in the region as of 2017, 88 percent of which are dedicated to oil palms.Timelapse of Borneo deforestation 2000-2017. Green to white= forest loss, green to black= forest cleared and converted to plantations in the same year, green to blue= forest permanently flooded by hydropower dams. Image by David Gaveau/CIFOR.Positive correlation“Every year since 2000 until 2017, we measured total forest loss, how much plantation area was added, and how much forest was cleared and converted to plantations in the same year,” CIFOR researcher and study lead author David Gaveau said. “This allows us to determine how much forest is being cleared by plantation companies.”The linked rise and fall in the rates of deforestation and plantation expansion point to a strong pattern, Gaveau said. “[M]any companies have stopped expanding the size of their plantations, and therefore they have been clearing and converting less and less forest since 2013 until 2017,” he said.Douglas Sheil of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, one of the study’s co-authors, said it was clear that “not all plantation developments caused conversion of forests to plantations,” because some of the plantations were established on areas that had already been cleared.This is an argument that various industry and government representatives have seized on to insist that the growth of plantations doesn’t contribute to deforestation, and to claim that expanding plantations is a reasonable use of already deforested land.However, the study found a positive correlation between industrial plantation expansion and forest loss in Borneo.About half of the old-growth forests that were cleared were ultimately converted to industrial plantations. The overwhelming majority of these, 92 percent, were converted within a year of being cleared, according to the study.“Expansion of industrial plantations has directly contributed to forest loss throughout the study period as seen in the areas of forest cleared and converted within the same year,” the study says.This correlation is particularly marked in Malaysian Borneo, where 58 percent of total deforestation since 2000 resulted in plantations within a year, compared to 38 percent in Kalimantan.“Because a time lag of less than one year between forest loss and plantation establishment is short, a company must have razed the forest before planting,” Gaveau said.Rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerFactors for slowdownThe study’s authors cited various factors for the recent slowdown in plantation expansion and deforestation, including a persistent decline in crude palm oil (CPO) prices.“The strong correlation between CPO prices and plantation expansion indicates that declining CPO prices since 2011 are the likely major cause behind declining expansion of plantations and associated conversion to plantations deforestation,” Gaveau said.He added that they could not rule out possible impacts from Indonesian initiatives to regulate expansion of plantations into forests. These include a moratorium on clearing peatlands, fire prevention measures, and no-deforestation commitments made by plantation companies and their clients.The study also noted that 2017 was a non-El Niño year, resulting in wetter conditions with fewer fires — a major cause of forest loss in 2015 and 2016.All these factors combined to contribute to the decline in forest loss in 2017.But the researchers say there’s still much to be done to ensure the remaining forests in Borneo are protected from the expansion of industrial plantations.“Fires and industrial plantations continue to cause deforestation, and we see no sign that plantation developments are seeking to avoid forest conversions,” the study says.Safrudin Mahendra, executive director of the NGO Save Our Borneo (SOB), welcomed the findings of slowing deforestation and plantation expansion rates, but said they shouldn’t be seen as a sign that plantation companies were committed to reining in their operations.“It’s not because the companies are getting less ambitious about clearing forests,” he said. “It’s because the available land in Borneo is getting scarcer.”Gaveau said scarcity of land and workers, as well as investments shifting to other regions, including Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua, might also have played a role in the slowing of plantation expansion in Borneo.However, he discounted a theory that companies didn’t need to clear as much land in 2017 after devastating fires in 2015 razed huge swaths of primary and peat forest. He said there was no correlation between the two, and the slowdown in plantation expansion began after 2012, well before the 2015 fires.Gaveau added that while the land cleared by those fires might potentially be converted into plantations in the future, the research hadn’t found an increase in plantation expansion on such already-cleared lands in 2016 and in 2017. “Instead, we continue to find a steady downward trend in 2016 and in 2017,” he said.Peatland deforestation to make way for a palm oil plantation in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia. Photo credit: Glenn Hurowtiz.Case studyA recent case of peat forest being cleared for a palm oil plantation has been reported by activists in Indonesia’s Central Kalimantan province.Safrudin from the SOB said locals had complained of fires in a peat swamp in the district of West Kotawaringin last year. Activists surveying the site last October reported seeing heavy equipment being used to clear the area. They reported their findings to the authorities, including the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, the presidentially appointed Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG), and the provincial government and police department.Only the BRG responded, Safrudin said. The agency sent investigators to the field with the SOB activists, where they found an extensive network of canals had been dug to drain the peat swamp.The BRG officials also found an orangutan nest in the area, which the province’s conservation agency has identified as a habitat for the critically endangered Borneo orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus). Upon further checking, the BRG and the activists found no evidence that the Ministry of Environment and Forestry had issued a permit allowing the forest in question to be converted for a plantation.Safrudin said he suspected that the company behind the clearing had employed local farmers to do the grunt work. “Once the peat clearing was discovered, the company could easily use that to apply for a forest conversion permit,” he said. “They could argue that the forest had already been cleared by locals and thus could be converted.” (Safrudin declined to name the company, saying he hadn’t been able to verify the allegation.)He said the BRG had asked the Ministry of Environment and Forestry in December to follow up on the findings, but there’s been no response to date. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

NBA: Rose fined, back with Knicks after mystery absence

first_img15-year-old Gauff stuns Venus anew in first round “Derrick Rose has rejoined the team and has been fined. He is expected to be in uniform tomorrow in Philadelphia,” the Knicks public relations department said on Twitter Tuesday.READ: Derrick Rose mysterious no-show for Knicks’ gameFEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnIn brief remarks to reporters during a practice session on Tuesday, Rose said he had returned to Chicago to be with his family but did not elaborate.“It was a family issue,” Rose said. “For one, it had nothing to do with the team or basketball. Senators think TWG’s move to axe motorcycle taxi pilot run an act of ‘revenge’ Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Sharapova to return from ban in April at Stuttgart event Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite ‘Old school work ethic’ pays off for immaculate Federer Rodgers again falls short of another Super Bowl stint Senators think TWG’s move to axe motorcycle taxi pilot run an act of ‘revenge’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member MOST READ New York Knicks’ Derrick Rose arrives at Federal Court in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. APNEW YORK, United States — New York Knicks star Derrick Rose has been fined an unspecified amount and is back with the team following his mysterious no-show, the NBA franchise said on Tuesday.Rose baffled team officials and fans after failing to appear for the Knicks’ 110-96 loss to the New Orleans Pelicans at Madison Square Garden on Monday.ADVERTISEMENT “That’s the first time I ever felt like that emotionally and I had to be with my family.”Asked why he had not responded to calls from the Knicks management, Rose replied that he needed his “space.”The 28-year-old Rose, the 2011 NBA Most Valuable Player with the Chicago Bulls, has been effective in his first season with the Knicks.He’s averaging 17.3 points in 33 games, missing a few earlier this season with back spasms. CBBADVERTISEMENT Super Bowl a tossup at legal sports books Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

See More

Chism eager to work with Guiao once more

first_imgMOST READ Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos “The vibe is still the same. He doesn’t show it but I can get him to crack a smile every now and then,” said Chism Friday at FCL Center as the two reunite this PBA Commissioner’s Cup under the banner of NLEX.“He’s a good coach and I’ll play for him any time… That’s how much respect I have for him.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnChism’s admiration for Guiao goes unnoticed, though.Guiao said Chism, despite never having played with the current Road Warriors in any point of his career, has full jelled with the team just days after joining NLEX. Taal Volcano continues to emit steam, ash from weak explosions Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite LATEST STORIES Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home INQUIRER FILE PHOTOFor the fourth time in his career, Wayne Chism will be working with head coach Yeng Guiao.The two’s partnership started in 2014 when the former Tennessee Volunteer was hired as Rain or Shine’s import and now that he’ll be back as Guiao’s foreign reinforcement, Chism said nothing’s changed since the first time he’s worked for the fiery head coach.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Baby Tams seek to prove they belong among HS elite China counts sharp rise in coronavirus cases, 2 in Beijing 2 ‘bookies’ bet collectors held in Quezon Beggar dead in Quezon hit-and-run incident Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town “I don’t see any problems with Wayne, he doesn’t have personality issues and he can work with anybody,” said Guiao. “He’s the type of guy who will make his teammates comfortable with him, not only with his personality but with his game as well.”“Actually there’s almost no effort for him to get along with the players, it comes naturally because he’s friendly with anybody,” said Guiao. Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal tieslast_img read more

See More

Cunningham – From 800m to 400m hurdles

first_imgRicardo Cunningham is making gains in his move from the 800 to the 400 metres hurdles. On Saturday, June 3, he set a personal best of 49.55 seconds in a victory at the National Stadium at the third JAAA All Comers meet of the season. Now 35, Cunningham says 2004 Olympic 400 metre hurdles runner-up Danny McFarlane is one of his role models. Cunningham shot out of the blocks and disconnected 2013 World Youth champion Marvin Williams. Afterwards, he said, “that was the aim because I’ve been working on my first 250m in training.” Now at the University of Technology, Williams held on to second place with a time of 50.83 seconds. Cunningham was gratified by the 0.11 second reduction of his personal best. He described 2017 as a rough season. “I started out this year on my own until I got some technical help from Floyd Quarrie. “I had an interest in the 400 metre hurdles from 2010,” he recalled calmly of his days at the University of Technology and the MVP Track Club where maestro Stephen Francis is head coach, “and while at MVP, I wanted to take up the event but probably Mr Francis didn’t see me doing as well or probably just wanted me to focus on the 800m.” Nevertheless, he was Jamaica Inter-Collegiate champion and national champion and moved his personal best to 1 minute 47.14 seconds. To pursue his goals in the 400m hurdles, he left the MVP, spent the 2016 season at the Cameron Blazers Club, “and now”, he said, “this year I’m freelancing.” Quarrie, sprints and hurdles coach at Immaculate Conception High School and an adviser o a small band of senior athletes, says Cunningham’s new personal best puts him in a good spot. “49.5 now, I think, is putting him in good standing leading up into World Trials”, analysed the coach. Technical work Between now and the June 22 start date of the four-day National Senior Championships, Quarrie plans to have Cunningham work on the last part of the race. He thinks Cunningham’s 800m strength is an asset. “Having the 800m background that he has”, he said, “and I’ve been working on getting him faster and hurdling better so the plan is to contend with those top athletes breaking the 49 barrier.” Cunningham, the winner at the UTech Classic where he ran 49.98 seconds to beat 2016 Olympic finalist Annsert Whyte, is inspired by McFarlane who also made a late switch to the hurdles. “He’s certainly one of the guys that motivate me and make me know that it’s possible,” he said.last_img read more

See More

JFF will not pursue Cavalier, Sandals play-off allegations

first_img “But I have the report in front of me and there is nothing in it pertaining to the accusations of the game. Both the referee and the match commissary reports say nothing about that. So why would we pursue the matter and on what basis would we pursue the matter?” he asked. Boys’ Town coach and Premier League Clubs Association (PLCA) director, Andrew Price refused to commented on the incident, saying he was not present, while noting his belief that it would be unfair for him to give an opinion. Price, however, stated that it was the obligation of the players and the clubs to treat the game with integrity regardless of the qualification situation. “I can only go by reports, I was not at the game and I cannot put myself in a position where I could comment. But based on reports, it is up to the integrity of the players of the sport to treat the sport with integrity and I hope the clubs would have treated the game with integrity,” said Price. “But it would be foolish to make a comment as I wasn’t at the game and I don’t really know what happened,” Price added. Meanwhile, when contacted, Cavalier’s club chairman, Rudolph Speid, refused to comment on the result, but Sandals assistant coach, Orville Bryan, categorically refuted the allegations. “We came to Kingston, we needed one point to win the game. We trained all week to try and contain ourselves and make sure that we score and try to make sure we did not get beaten. That was our biggest challenge. We scored first and it gave the guys a little room to relax. Unfortunately, only two teams could have gone to the Premiership – we were one of them. “There’s always gonna be talk. That is not for us to decide. We are in the Premiership and we are very happy with that. So we leave everything for whoever to say what they want. So we flatly refute the allegation without even a question,” Bryan said. Report prepared The Jamaica Football Federation’s (JFF) head of competitions and facilities overseer, Ian Kemble, insisted that no investigation will be launched into the Cavalier/Sandals Premier League play-off match amidst suggestions that the integrity of Sunday’s game at Stadium East was compromised. With Cavalier already securing their passage to the nation’s top-flight football competition from the previous weekend, second placed Sandals only required a draw to qualify for their first Premier League berth. But after a 1-1 draw, in a game played at pedestrian pace, both sides have been accused of not playing the game in the right spirit. However, Kemble noted there’s nothing in the referee’s or match commissary’s report to suggest there was any wrongdoing in the game, and as a result the local football authority will not pursue the matter. Kemble also pointed to the result of the fixture involving the other two teams in the playoffs, with Rivoli, which still had a chance to qualify going into Sunday’s game, slamming Priory by 8-0. “We can’t speak to accusations, so there will be no investigation. Rivoli also scored eight goals against Priory and Rivoli are not eight goals better than Priory,” Kemble stated.last_img read more

See More

Mullings : Age is just a number

first_img Mullings added that apart from still being in the physical shape he wants to be, his passion and hunger for excelling in the sport have also not waned. “It’s something I still want to do,” he said. “I still love waking up and boxing. I still love training and going to the gym. My mind and my heart are still in it.” But Mullings said that although he expects to be around for the next few years, he does not intend to be around long enough to be considered “washed up”. “I also don’t want to be one of the fighters that overstays their welcome and fights past their prime. Based on the years I have yet, I believe I have five years left in me, so I don’t want to overstay my welcome,” Mullings shared. Good shape Newly crowned Wray and Nephew Contender Series Champion Sakima ‘The Mauler’ Mullings says that he still has a lot left to offer to boxing and aims to compete at the highest level for another number of years. Mullings defeated Canadian Phil Rose in the competition’s grand final last month and said after the bout that his conditioning was unmatched throughout the competition and in the island. The 35-year-old said that his age means nothing in deciding how long he can continue in the sport and that he still aims to reach the heights of other top Jamaican boxers such as Nicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters, if possible. “At the end of the day, I believe that a boxer’s age can’t be judged chronologically,” he said. “A boxer is like a car. You age based on how many miles are on the speedometer. You judge the age based on whether it’s ever been in an accident. It’s whether you’ve really been damaged or hurt in a fight. I see myself still as a young fighter and I believe that physically, I’m not damaged goods. I don’t have a lot of miles on my speedometer and I’ve never been beat up. I’ve lost a fight before, but Sakima Mullings has never been beat up. I have very minimal wear and tear.”last_img read more

See More