Ajax star who sparked VAR check gloats: It’s a Madrid humiliation!

first_imgAjax star Noussair Mazraoui has revelled in his side’s incredible 4-1 win over Real Madrid, insisting that they have caused a “humiliation” by dumping out the Champions League holders.The unfancied Dutch side were 2-1 down from the first leg heading into what appeared a daunting return meeting at the Bernabeu in the last 16 tie against Santiago Solari’s men.But the visitors dominated the game and claimed a historic 4-1 win on the night, sending them through to the quarter-finals of the competition and ending Madrid’s spell of dominance that had seen them win the last three titles in a row. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! There was, however, an incident of controversy, with Ajax’s third goal having to be referred to VAR for what proved a lengthy period of at least two minutes after Dusan Tadic had fired past Thibaut Courtois and into the top corner of the net.Prior to the former Southampton winger’s strike, Mazraoui had hunted down the ball that was heading out of play by the touchline and stretched to nudge it back inside.It was, however, an extremely tight call with it proving difficult to outright confirm if part of the ball had stayed in play or, indeed, rolled past the line.The officials ruled in favour of Ajax and the goal stood, with Mazraoui admitting afterwards that he knew it was going to go to a VAR check as soon as the ball hit the net.He told AT5: “I made that tackle and thought: ‘now I should keep the ball in play, so Real would think it’s out and stop playing’.”I didn’t know whether it stayed inside [the line] or not, but when we scored after that, I knew the VAR would double check that moment.”In the end it was a goal. Great. We’ve made some history. We made Amsterdam proud. It’s a humiliation for Real Madrid and a big win for us.”Ajax will now await their opponents for the last eight, with Tottenham having also joined the Amsterdam club in the quarter-finals following their 4-0 aggregate win over Borussia Dortmund.The draw for the next stage of the competition takes place on March 15 at UEFA’s headquarters in Nyon.last_img read more

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From Copenhagen to Cancun: Technology Transfer

first_imgAn update on UNFCCC efforts to promote technology transfer between countries.The UNFCCC climate negotiations are often so fraught with entrenched disagreement that success stories seem rare. However, technology transfer is one area in which definitive progress was made in Copenhagen and throughout negotiations in 2010, progress that should lead into a decision on technology in Cancun.What is Technology Transfer? From Copenhagen to Cancun covers the key issues in the ongoing international climate negotiations. The series looks at where things stand after the 2009 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) meeting in Copenhagen and how discussions are progressing towards COP-16 in Cancun.Technology TransferAdaptationForests and REDDClimate FinanceEmission Reduction PledgesLegal Form of the AgreementIn the context of climate change, “technology transfer” refers to how technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and aid climate adaptation efforts are developed and shared across borders. Developing countries will need more than finance to address climate change – they will need new technology for mitigation (emissions reductions), such as wind power, and new technologies for adaptation, such as flood control technologies and drought resistant strains of corn and wheat.Because technology transfer will facilitate global emissions reductions, it is considered key to reaching a global agreement. The Bali Action Plan, a decision made at the UNFCCC meeting in 2007 called for strengthened efforts to move technologies from developed to developing countries.Progress From Copenhagen to CancunIn the early days of Copenhagen negotiations, country representatives made progress on the technology transfer text. By the end of the first week, negotiators appeared close to agreeing that a new international mechanism for development and transfer of technology should be created.This mechanism would have two parts – a Technology Executive Committee made up of politically appointed country representatives that would provide coordination, and a Climate Technology Center made up of technical experts that could lead capacity-building in countries that need it. This carefully negotiated plan represented a smart compromise between the need for a political body to provide guidance and coordination and a more down-to-earth mechanism with technical experts than can implement solutions.Heads of state arrived late in the second week and switched gears to drafting the Copenhagen Accord. The Accord contains a decision “to establish a Technology Mechanism to accelerate technology development and transfer in support of action on adaptation and mitigation”, but didn’t specify in detail how that mechanism would work.Since Copenhagen, negotiators have continued to make progress on the mechanism, including the composition and mandate of the Technology Executive Committee and Climate Technology Centre and Network.In Cancun, negotiators should finalize the text started in Copenhagen and formalize it in a UNFCCC decision to create a technology mechanism, which would kickstart the Committee and Centre’s work. Technology is an issue that can provide momentum towards a successful global agreement.Creating an effective technology center and networkA core element of the technology mechanism in the negotiating text now is a network, headed by the Climate Technology Centre. The network is meant to be both an ‘on-the-ground’ presence of the technology mechanism and a way for existing research, knowledge sharing and capacity building institutions to connect to the UNFCCC. In order to best build a technology network that will help countries develop and share new technologies, it’s not enough to repurpose existing institutions that work on the issue, because not all regions and technologies are getting adequate attention right now. The negotiators should consider whether additional effort or new centers are needed to help fill gaps.To identify the needs, the Climate Technology Centre should be tasked with analyzing gaps in research, knowledge sharing, capacity-building on policy support on adaptation and mitigation, and identifying where new centers may be needed.Linking finance and technologyIn the negotiations thus far, it is unclear how a financial mechanism (which is negotiated separately) would mesh institutionally with the technology mechanism. Would the activities undertaken within the technology mechanism automatically be funded by the financial mechanism? Would the technology mechanism have the possibility to provide input for the financial mechanism’s funding decisions related to technologies?As the finance mechanism, including a new fund, takes shape, it’s important that the new institutional structure and procedures allow for smart technology decisions. The new finance mechanism should allow for input from the technology mechanism, so the technology experts can help inform the finance experts on where the biggest impacts can be made with the limited resources. These experts can also provide guidance on how to hold the financial mechanism accountable and report technology successes that can inform future funding decisions.Intellectual property rights shouldn’t hold up the dealOn the issue of intellectual property rights (IPR), such as patents, countries continue to disagree on how openly technologies should be shared.This disagreement should not hold up the important decision of creating the technology mechanism. IPR may be best left to future negotiations in the UNFCCC or other fora.No time to waitA decision in Cancun to create a strong technology mechanism with an effective Committee and Centre / Network will build momentum in the greater negotiations. More importantly, it will begin the transfer of crucially needed technologies truly enable low-carbon, climate-resilient development.last_img read more

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Jamaica Must Develop Organic Agriculture Industry – J.C. Hutchinson

first_imgMinister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. J.C. Hutchinson, says Jamaica must “vigorously pursue” the development of its own organic agriculture sector.He said the demand for organic produce continues to grow, with the global market estimated to value US$80 billion in 2015.“There are several proven benefits of organic farming, not least of which is the elimination of the use of synthetic inputs, fertilisers and pesticides. With the increasing consumer demand for organic produce, there can be no doubt that this is a pathway to the future,” he said.The Minister made the call as he launched a range of organic fertiliser products at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on Thursday (July 13).Local company, Growers Choice Avery’s Organic has partnered with the KIMITEC Group from Spain for the distribution of the products in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean.KIMITEC manufactures organic fertilisers, which help to boost soil structure and development of the plant’s root system, thereby improving crop quality and quantity.Minister Hutchinson welcomed the introduction of the KIMITEC range of organic fertilisers in Jamaica.He said the use of the products, coupled with the best farming practices, will go a far way in not only boosting farm productivity and profits, but also in improving the availability of safe and wholesome food to consumers.He added it is his “fervent wish that the products will boost the production levels of farmers and, thereby, contribute to this Government’s commitment to ensure an agricultural industry that brings growth and prosperity to Jamaica”.General Manager of Growers Choice Avery’s Organic Company, Prince Avery, noted that the fertilisers will stimulate the soil and increase farm yields.“(Produce) are going to have a longer shelf life. It is something that will be good for everyone overall. Going organic is the right way to go,” he said. He noted that the fertilisers are liquid-based, which will be ideal for local farmers, who are moving away from the granular products. “You have a lot of farmers in Jamaica who are going liquid instead of using granular fertiliser, and they are able to cut back on cost when they go liquid,” Mr. Avery said.last_img read more

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Montreal police arrest four after drug raids turn up 25 million in

first_imgMONTREAL – Police say four people have been arrested after a series of raids targeting a drug production and distribution ring in the Montreal area.Montreal police say they seized at least $2.5 million worth of methamphetamine as well as cocaine, crystal meth and $160,000 in cash.They say they recived a tip in April about a drug trafficking ring that was allegedly involved in selling heroin, cocaine and fentanyl.Provincial police and officers from the Trois-Rivieres and Longueuil forces also took part in the raids.The suspects, three men and a woman, are all known to police.They are expected to appear in court later today.(With files from Cogeco Nouvelles)last_img read more

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In the news today Oct 3

first_imgFour stories in the news for Wednesday, Oct. 3___EXPECT NASTY FEDERAL CAMPAIGN, TRUDEAU SAYSNext year’s federal election campaign will likely be the nastiest one yet, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday. Speaking at a Liberal fundraiser in northwestern Toronto, Trudeau was adamant his Liberal party won’t indulge in the expected mudslinging, saying positivity is the only way to go. Next year’s election is expected to pit Trudeau against the Conservatives under Harper’s successor, Andrew Scheer. For his part, Scheer said his party plans on focusing on policy in the upcoming election. Scheer also accused Trudeau of hypocrisy, noting that prominent Liberals such as Bill Morneau and Ahmed Hussen have called two Conservatives a Neanderthal and “not Canadian,” respectively.___B.C.’S LNG DEAL HAS HORGAN IN JUGGLING ACTThe prospect of billions of dollars in liquefied natural gas revenues has British Columbia’s government preparing for a political and environmental juggling act as Premier John Horgan attempts to hold together his minority government while appeasing ever watchful climate guardians. He described LNG Canada’s decision to build a $40-billion liquefied natural gas project in northern B.C. as akin to a “moon landing” in its historic magnitude, emphasizing just how much the project means to an economically deprived region of the province. But Green Leader Andrew Weaver, whose party is key to Horgan’s grasp of power, did not attend the signing ceremony and accused the NDP of a “grand hypocrisy.”___USMCA TWISTING NORTH AMERICAN TONGUESThe new moniker for the revamped North American Free Trade Agreement is already the butt of several jokes. NAFTA rolled off the tongue, but the acronym for the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement — the USMCA — will take a little getting used to. It was just minutes old when gags about the Village People song “YMCA” started bouncing around the internet. One thing is clear: President Donald Trump wanted a new name for an agreement he has repeatedly denounced as a disaster for his country.___CALGARY BURIED IN SNOWPeople in Calgary are digging out from the snowiest October day in 104 years — a new record. Roads and highways in and around the city Tuesday were covered in heavy, wet snow. Parts of Calgary reported snowfall amounts of up to 40 centimetres in a 12-hour period with similar amounts in the mountain parks and other areas of southern Alberta. Calgary police reported 251 collisions and dozens of flights were cancelled or delayed at Calgary International Airport, and at one point 80 transit buses were stuck or stalled on slippery streets.____ALSO IN THE NEWS:— Premier Rachel Notley and Lt.-Gov. Lois Mitchell are scheduled to attend the opening ceremony of the new Royal Alberta Museum.— A sentencing hearing will be held for Guido Amsel, who was found guilty of attempting to murder his former wife and two lawyers by sending them letter bombs.— Ontario Premier Doug Ford and Health Minister Christine Elliott are expected to make a health-care announcement.— The trial continues today for Jennifer Clark and Jeromie Clark, who have been charged with criminal negligence causing death and failure to provide the necessaries of life to their 14-month-old son.last_img read more

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Kanina Sue Turtles mom on a walk for closure that ends in

first_imgKenneth JacksonAPTN NewsBarbara Suggashie has only seen the house where her daughter died by suicide from the road.She’s never gone inside.She’s never gone in the room where Kanina Sue Turtle, 15, hung herself Oct. 29, 2016.But now Suggashie says she is ready.“I need closure,” she said.It’s about 314 kilometres to closure as she began the walk Thursday in Red Lake and is walking along Hwy. 105 to Sioux Lookout.She said she also wants to prove to Tikinagan Child and Family Services she is a good mother – that she loved Kanina.APTN uncovered the home where Kanina died is owned by Tikinagan, and is an agency-operated foster home.Suggashie said, so far, Tikinagan has agreed to support the walk.“They (Tik) want to know when I get there because they don’t want anybody in the house,” said Suggashie.She’s still thinking of what to say to Kanina once in the room.When asked she was silent.“I don’t know, but I have been talking about doing this for a long time,” she said. “I really miss her so much.”Kanina, left, with her mother, Barbara, several months before her death. Facebook photo.Kanina recorded her suicide on her iPod, as reported by APTN in February. She had tried the day before as well, and had several incidents of self-harm in the weeks prior.But somehow Kanina was left alone in a backroom of a foster home in Sioux Lookout for about 45 minutes before a Tikinagan worker came to check on her.APTN viewed the video, which is about an hour long.On the video the worker comes into the room and said what sounds like “Kanina, take my hand.”She then lays Kanina on the floor, which isn’t visible in the video, and leaves the room. She returns quickly talking on a cellphone with emergency personnel.She also appears to try to resuscitate Kanina by pumping air into her lungs with a plastic device.“She’s gone,” the woman says as a baby can be heard crying from another room.Within minutes sirens are heard and paramedics arrive.“No pulse,” one of them is heard saying.Kanina never said anything in the video where she died, but in the attempt the day before she did.“I don’t know what to do anymore,” Turtle says. “I’m sorry for what … umm… I’m going to do.”The video is just over a minute when she stopped recording.It was later learned by APTN that Kanina was suspected of being in a suicide pact.Kanina’s death is one of 11 currently being reviewed by the chief coroner of Ontario after he found issues with each child’s level of care while in protective services.Dirk Huyer is leading what he’s calling an “expert panel” to take an expanded review of each death between Jan. 1 2014 and July 31, 2017.That report is supposed to be released this summer.Kanina’s family still doesn’t know why she was left alone for 45 minutes the day she died but hope the Huyer’s report finds out.Suggashie said the walk is also suicide awareness and she and her son made it nine kilometre’s the first day.They were up early Friday to get started again.She’s not sure how long it will take them but Suggashie is convinced closure is on the other side of that door.“I need to do this,” she said.Kjackson@aptn.caUpdate: Barbara Suggashie says Tikinagan is now covering the costs of the walk, including providing a van and driver, as well as hotel rooms at night.last_img read more

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Salmon swimming past BC landslide on their own – but is it

first_img(Rescued Sockeye Salmon at Big Bar Landslide Crew Area. Photo courtesy: Gina Anderson @Gina-gerl imaging)This is the first year Esk’etemc doesn’t have salmon for its community and although Robbins is happy with the recent salmon success at the landslide, he says more could have been done.“I like what I see happening now, but when the landslide first happened I think a state of emergency should have been declared,” says Robbins.“And I strongly believe they should have been transporting fish earlier, and there should have been a complete closure for all fisheries along the coast.”The Tsilhqot’in Nation also believes closures are needed.At the beginning of August, they declared a local state of emergency because of the salmon crisis from the landslide and issued a salmon closure last week, prohibiting sockeye, chinook, and coho retention on the Chilcotin, Chilko, and Taseko rivers and tributaries.(Kukpi7 (Chief) Fred Robbins of Esk’etemc First Nation held a ceremony for the salmon by the Big Bar Landslide. Photo courtesy: Jonathan Hand)Chief Jimmy Lulua of Xeni Gwet’in First Nation says the Tsilhqot’in have never had to put restrictions on their members.“The only people that have had restrictions are Indigenous people,” says Lulua. “DFO’s mandate is if First Nations’ needs are not being met than they have to shut down sport fishing.  We’ve tested that theory and it doesn’t work.  We shut down our fishing, other First Nations along the river have shut down their fishing, but yet sport fishing is still happening.“Governments have done nothing.  They say they want to work with us, but at the end of the day actions speak louder than words.”The landslide also prompted four Tsilhqot’in communities to buy fish from Ahousaht First Nation on Vancouver Island.Hundreds of coho arrived on a flatbed trailer last week.“This is the first time in our history that we have had to buy fish and to me that is unacceptable,” says Lulua.“There was expected a million fish to make it back to our spawning beds so a couple thousand fish making it over the slide to me is unacceptable.  Something has to change.“When you threaten our fish, you threaten our livelihoods and that means we go to war.”lhamelin@aptn.ca@laurie_hamelin Laurie HamelinAPTN NewsIt’s been over two months since a massive landslide on a remote part of the Fraser River three hours north of Lillooet, British Columbia was first discovered.Boulders the size of a two story house crashed a 125 meters down the cliff into the river blocking hundreds of thousands of salmon migrating to their spawning grounds – threatening to wipe out a critical food source for First Nations.But after 10 weeks of hard work that included using controlled blasts, moving fish upstream by helicopter, two fish wheels, and transporting fish by truck, salmon are now swimming past the blockade without help.“We’ve been here for a few months now and salmon are getting through on their own, which was our priority, natural passage,” says Greg Witzky.Witzky is the First Nations incident commander with the Big Bar Unified Command – three levels of government leading response operations (First Nations, provincial and federal).“In the last week, almost 120,000 salmon have swum through by themselves,” says Witzky.“To me that is a success, if we can keep that up and get the rest of the salmon through that way then we have done our job and we’ll make history here by doing this.”(Gregy Witzky, First Nations incident commander with the Big Bar Unified Command. Photo: Laurie Hamelin/APTN)APTN News toured the Big Bar Landslide Incident Command Post set up in Lillooet.The visit to the landslide area was cancelled because of heavy rains which grounded the helicopter.But Witzky offered to walk us down to the river to show us his old fishing spot.He’s been fishing salmon on the Fraser since he was a young boy.“I’ve been praying since I got here for the salmon, for everyone who relies on the salmon,” he says.“For the animals, the ecosystem.”Witzky works with the Fraser River Aboriginal Fisheries Secretariat and says fish are his life.When he was asked to be part of the unified command he literally jumped at the chance.“I was offered the opportunity and I jumped at it, jumped higher than the fish when I was offered,” Witzky says with a smile.(Directional signs at the Big Bar Landslide Incident Command Post, Lillooet B.C. Photo: Laurie Hameline/APTN)Witzky explains that 180 crew members, many of them First Nations, have worked tirelessly to save the chinook and sockeye.“First Nations involvement here is right from the top level steering committee all the way to field crews on the ground and managers in the field,” he says.“Probably one third of the staff in the field are First Nations and they come from all over the province.”Back at the command post we met Rebecca Riley who is from the local St’at’imc Nation.Riley has been working on the punt boat team – 14 days on, 3 days off.“When I first got out there, to see this,” Riley pretends to pull in heavy nets. “Big powerful guys and just working together. I’m looking around thinking this is where I am going to be working, wow this is intense.”“As a First Nations woman it was really amazing to see forestry guys, DFO guys, coast guard guys, old people, young people, women, men.  Everyone came together and we we’re all doing the same job – to try to save the salmon.”(Rebecca Riley, Fish Health Technician and Jeff Brady, Deputy to the Federal Incident Commander. Photo: Laurie Hamelin/APTN)With the salmon now swimming past the landslide on their own, helicopter and truck transfer has been stopped temporarily.Riley is on stand-by in Lillooet, until the fish need help again.“I’m sad that I am not working, but at the same time I am really happy that they’re making it through on their own,” says Riley. “The species are going to make it, it’s moving, it’s really powerful.  It’s a life changing experience.  I don’t know how else to explain it, but I have a different view on life, I feel proud of myself for helping.“Like we’re saving a species, we’re saving the salmon.”But there are still more salmon runs to come up the river. Pink salmon is now arriving and fingers are crossed they’ll also be able to make it by themselves.Last Wednesday, Kukpi7 (Chief) Fred Robbins of Esk’etemc First Nation held a ceremony for the salmon.“The salmon have been taking care of us for generations upon generations upon generations,” says Robbins.“They have been providing us with a valuable food source and sustenance, so we needed to have a ceremony for them.  It was our turn to look after the salmon.”(Big Bar Landslide on the Fraser River, B.C. Photo courtesy: Big Bar Unified Command)Four government helicopters flew the chief and 35 others out by the landslide area.“We had four salmon in a big screen net, two males and two females, and when we started singing with the drums and the rattle, echoing up the valley, all of a sudden the salmon started to jump and move,” says Robbins.“It was like they just came to life.  It was very emotional for me.”In a phone interview, the chief explains that he immediately went into action to help the salmon after first seeing the landslide.“After my first fly over, I came back and had an emergency Band meeting,” says Robbins. “I had over 250 members from my community there and I gave them an update on the landslide.  I told them our salmon is in jeopardy and if you are going to go fish I want you to realize that that could be the last salmon you ever catch in the Fraser River.“That it is vitally important that you allow every salmon to get through.  It was a very emotional time, some of our elders were in tears.”last_img read more

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Polisario Lawyer Challenges Arrest of Front’s ‘Ambassador’ at Peruvian Airport

Rabat – A lawyer representing the Polisario Front has filed a complaint challenging the decision by Peruvian border authorities to deny Khadijetou Mokhtar, the “ambassador” of the self-proclaimed Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR), from entering Peru.Mokhtar is currently in custody at Jorge Chavez Airport police after Peruvian authorities were ordered to prevent her from entering the country.The Polisario representative was arrested in Lima on Saturday for “impersonating an ambassador,” as Peru does not recognize the separatist front as an independent state, explained the Moroccan Embassy to Peru. Mokhtar is also accused by Peruvian authorities of “engaging in political activities which contravene Peru’s immigration laws” and “interfering in the internal affairs” of the country, because she had previously engaged in political activities in the country outside of her status as a tourist travelling on a Spanish passport.In response to being barred from entry, the Polisario representative said in a statement to a pro-Polisario news outlet that “the Sahara diplomats were surprised by the decision of the Peruvian authorities to deport me from the country despite the possession of a valid Spanish passport, which means that the issue is political and that Morocco is responsible for it.”Mustapha Salma Ould Sidi Mouloud, Polisario Front dissident and former police chief in the Tindouf camps, criticized her statement on his Facebook account, which he said belied her tenuous claim of being an “ambassador.”“The statement made by Mokhtar made me wonder who does this woman represent; is it Spain, as she possesses a Spanish passport, or the Polisario, which appointed her ambassador to Peru?” Ould Sidi Mouloud asked.Edited by Elisabeth Myers read more

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Caring for the Earth will help advance economic growth not hinder it

Ms. Migiro said in her remarks to a General Assembly event to mark International Mother Earth Day that the world is undergoing tremendous change, with considerable growth in the past two decades, particularly in emerging economies. Hundreds of millions of people – in Asia, Latin America and, increasingly, in Africa – have risen from poverty, she noted. “We need to bring these benefits to hundreds of millions more: decent jobs, clean, affordable energy, and all the social and economic benefits that such advances can bring.“But we will not achieve this goal unless we respect the human and natural capital that is the foundation for our prosperity and well-being,” she cautioned.In 2009, the Assembly proclaimed 22 April as International Mother Earth Day, expressing its conviction that, to achieve a just balance among the economic, social and environmental needs of present and future generations, “it is necessary to promote harmony with nature and the Earth.” Ms. Migiro told participants at today’s dialogue on harmony with nature that the decline in natural capital is rarely reflected when calculating the sum of a country’s total annual production of goods and services.“We neither factor in the benefits of ecosystems, nor the costs of their destruction,” she stated. “A country can cut its forests and deplete its fisheries, and yet it shows only as a positive gain in GDP [gross domestic product], ignoring the corresponding decline in assets. “We count arms sales on the plus side of the ledger, and spend many billions of dollars a year to subsidize coal, gas and oil – with little impact on the lives of the poor. We need to revise our accounting and embrace a low-carbon, resource-efficient, pro-poor economic model.Decoupling growth from pollution and natural resource depletion will not put a brake on development, as those wedded to the status quo still argue. On the contrary, it will make growth sustainable,” she stated.She added that next year’s UN Conference on Sustainable Development, also known as “Rio+20,” is an opportunity to assess the world’s relationship with nature over the last 20 years, to reaffirm commitments made at previous sustainable development summits in Rio and Johannesburg, to inject new impetus and to chart a sustainable way forward. “A holistic view of environmental, social and economic well-being is indeed the only route to truly sustainable development,” Ms. Migiro said. 20 April 2011Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro today called on countries to embrace a low-carbon, resource-efficient, pro-poor economic model, which will ensure progress while also promoting harmony with nature. read more

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Phonics were being taught 350 years ago one of worlds oldest childrens

first_imgThe book was published when schools were predominately the preserve of the rich and many poorer parents educated their children at home.Dr Seager said: “Parents could use this book with their children and children could also read it themselves. The idea of printing a book exclusively for children was new. It was also a period when books were just starting to be acquired by middle-class readers. Previously, they were the domain of the aristocracy. But this is not a story book. You won’t find at the end that they all get home in time for supper.” Scribbles in the back of the book appear to be Ms Berks’ practice of styles and rhyming. The author of the book is only known as T.H, who is thought to have been a school teacher.Research has shown that phonics can boost children’s reading age by an average of 28 months by the time they turn seven.Boys benefit the most from the back-to-basics system and actually overtake girls after just two years of school, according to a study by Dr Marlynne Grant, an educational psychologist, who analysed the performance of pupils taught to read using synthetic phonics from the reception year upwards.The school had high levels of special educational needs. However, a study by London School of Economics last year found that while phonics help children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as their first language, it has had “no measurable effect on pupils’ reading scores at age 11”. The book offers a fascinating insight into the education and reading of young people in the 17th centuryDr Nick Seager Phonics were being taught 350 years ago and are not simply a modern craze, one of the world’s oldest children’s book has revealed.The method of teaching that sees words broken down into their constituent parts has seen a surge in interest in recent years and is championed by the Government as key to raising literacy standards.But despite phonics learning being introduced as a UK pilot in 18 local authorities in 2005, the system actually dates back to the 17th Century.It is referenced in a book for youngsters that was published in 1667 and has now been uncovered in the archives at the University of Keele. The book was published in 1667 - almost half a century before the next known surviving copy of British children's literature The battered leather pocket book for children includes a guide on phonics, which breaks down words into syllables and makes them easier to learn.The book, called A Guide to the Childe and Youth, was published almost half a century before the next known surviving copy of British children’s literature.”The book offers a fascinating insight into the education and reading of young people in the 17th century,” said Dr Nick Seager, a senior lecturer in English at Keele.”The guide brings to life the debates from the past and gives us an idea of what animated people all those years ago. It offers a wonderful insight into what it was like to be a child during this time and this keyhole to the past provides a centrality to current concerns and how it teaching back then has shaped our education today.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The book was published in 1667 – almost half a century before the next known surviving copy of British children’s literatureCredit:Caters The 350-year-old book is as much a literacy text book as it is a behavioural one, helping children to learn literacy through an innovative rhyming alphabet with intricate woodcut illustrations.The book is divided to give separate guides and instructions to younger and older children. There are methods to develop reading, writing and maths skills with religious doctrine and moral instruction thrown in for good measure.For the very early learners, the guide has an illustrated alphabet, with rhymes to help young learners remember each letter. The letter ‘C’, for example, is partnered with a wood-cut picture of a cat playing a fiddle to dancing mice. ‘D’ is an action shot of how “the dog will bite a thief at night”. Then ‘F’ is “the idle fool is whipt at school”.The copy at Keele contains the handwritten notes of its previous owners, Mary Berks and Ann Berks from Newcastle under Lyme, Staffordshire, from around 1776.last_img read more

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Girls twice as unhappy as a decade ago because of exam stress

Girls feeling more able to talk more openly about mental health makes me optimistic for the futureIzzy, 17 More than one in three said they had done this, compared to 28 per cent in 2011, though only 60 per cent said their voices had been heard and made a difference.  More girls were likely to self-identify as feminist, with the proportion rising from a third in 2013 to a half this year. Girlguiding’s Chief Guide Amanda Medler said: “The message could not be clearer from girls and young women about the seriousness of the issues they’re facing daily and the negative impact on their lives. “It’s not good enough that today girls are unhappier and more of them are experiencing problems with their mental health than in previous years.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Exam stress and social media mean twice as many girls are unhappy as they were a decade ago, a Girlguiding survey has found.Almost 30 per cent of young women aged 17 to 21 say they are not happy, up from 11 per cent in 2009. Anxiety around exams was cited as a leading cause of stress, with 69 per cent of 11 to 21 year-olds saying exams and tests were the main cause among girls their age, and 59 per cent said pressure from social media was to blame. Girls were significantly less likely to be socialising in person with their friends, with the proportion of 11 to 16-year-olds who said they spent time at each others’ houses falling from 69 per cent to 21 per cent during the last decade. Over the same period there was an 11 per cent rise in girls saying they socialised with friends on social media. The charity said there was more openness about mental health, and girls were more likely to speak up about issues that affected them or that they cared about.  Izzy, 17, a member of Girlguiding’s Advocate panel, said: “The research from the last ten years doesn’t paint a great picture for girls and young women, but it’s reassuring to see some positive signs. “Girls feeling more able to talk more openly about mental health makes me optimistic for the future, as does the increase in the number of girls who are speaking out on all issues.”The report also highlighted the growing issue of online abuse, with one in four saying they had been threatened on social media, and almost one in ten of those aged over 13 saying they had had photographs of a sexual nature sent around their schools or workplaces. However they were more likely to report it than in the past, with the proportion of 11-21 year-olds saying they would report abuse to the social media site doubling to 46 per cent.  read more

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Duchess of York says next generation of royals can learn from her

Prince Andrew and his bride Sarah Ferguson waving to crowds as they leave Westminster Abbey, London Credit:PA The Duchess of York’s marriage to Prince Andrew ended in January 1992, but seven months later photographs appeared on the front page of the Daily Mirror of her sunbathing topless with American John Bryan, who could be seen kissing her feet. The Queen was said to be furious. The Duchess was at Balmoral with the Royal Family when the news broke, and was forced to return to London that day.It would prove to be the start of a wedge between her and many of the royals, but the duchess’ appearance at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan this summer has been dubbed the moment she was re-installed as a member of “the firm”.  She said: “The ladies next door – Emma and Louise – made the dress. Green for Ireland, and the handbag was what mum had [at my wedding].  Show more The Duchess of York arrives at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle for the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince HarryCredit:Gareth Fuller/PA The Duchess of York says Princess Diana would have ‘loved every moment’ of William and Harry’s weddings. She says that she continues to ‘miss her’ 21 years after her tragic death. pic.twitter.com/biQORCKb0G— Good Morning Britain (@GMB) November 21, 2018 Among the tips she passed on was to remember the names of people who open doors for them and the people who cook their food.  Sarah, Duchess of York, arrives at her daughter Princess Eugenie's wedding The Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson believes the Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex and her own daughters can survive royal scrutiny in the age of social media by learning from mistakes she made. From reality shows to affairs and money trouble, the duchess’ royal faux pas have been laid bare over the years. During an interview on ITV’s Good Morning Britain, it was suggested she and close friend Princess Diana of Wales were the monarchy’s “guinea pigs”, and that the next generation would go through the same experiences but with the added pressure of Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. But the duchess, affectionately known as Fergie, said Princess Eugenie and Beatrice as well as the Duchess of Cambridge and Sussex were better than her to deal with life in the spotlight.She told the programme: “I often say to my girls, I’ve been there and made the mistakes so they know what not to do, it’s really cool, actually. “All I can say to anyone, including my girls, is be who you are.”They’re going to write things, they’re going to say things. They will. And 50 per cent of people like you, 50 per cent don’t.”Do what you feel with the integrity of kindness.” Prince Andrew and his bride Sarah Ferguson waving to crowds as they leave Westminster Abbey, London “I opened the bag and there were the green admission tickets from 1986.”There’s always something I do… Everyone said ‘Go into the church and be demure. Don’t go over the top.'”But you can’t. I went nuts… The lady in the wheelchair was mum’s best friend.”On the newest member of her family, her son-in-law Jack, she said: “You can’t write or say – it was such an honour. The love is so strong – they’re twin flames. “To see Eugenie blossom as she has and to be so brave with scoliosis.”With so many weddings, rumours have surfaced regarding her relationship with Prince Andrew. Piers Morgan asked the duchess, given that they now live together, whether they would be getting back together. “Thousands of people [ask me that],” she replied. “Piers – you’re such a romantic. What I love about that is that I’m different, and he’s different.”With time running out on the programme – the duchess was asked outright if she was re-marrying. “Piers – get a life,” was the reply.The breakdown in the marriage had caused tension between the duchess and the Queen, but there were only warm words for the monarch.   Sarah, Duchess of York, arrives at her daughter Princess Eugenie’s weddingCredit:Getty The Duchess of York arrives at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle for the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry As an outsider, the duchess had found a confidant in Princess Diana. And the wedding brought back strong memories of their friendship.”She’d have loved every moment of it – she’d be so proud,” she said. “Even before – she would literally have been saying I cannot believe these boys have done so well. “Nobody made me laugh better than as her – she was hilarious.  She had this enormous compassion. She’d have been proud of Meghan and Catherine too. “She’d want to embrace them and tell them they’re doing well.” But it was a year which boasted two royal weddings, with the duchess’s daughter Princess Eugenie marrying Jack Brooksbank at the same venue – Windsor Castle. The Duchess of York wore green “for Ireland” and accessorised with the bag her own mother carried at her wedding the Prince Andrew in 1986. And it appears it was the last time the bag was used.  “And then someone said ‘Fergie’, and it was the old Fergie back and I felt that sense of support from the crowds.”I’m very happy for my friend Diana, and honoured and grateful to Harry and Mehgan for inviting me. “It was very kind of them and I can’t thank them enough.” Answering presenter Piers Morgan, who suggested it was a comeback moment, the duchess said: “It’s very kind of you to say – it was nerve-wracking. I’m glad I didn’t fall in those high heels.”I kept thinking of Diana in my heart, and mum. “My father would say, ‘show goes on, get on with it’. He always taught me to walk tall.”The thousands gathered in Windsor were sent into a frenzy when she arrived, as yells of “Fergie” reverberated around the castle grounds. “I wanted to cry,” the duchess said. “It was quite extraordinary. I was wondering, ‘Are they doing it for me?’ She said: “I just think that Her Majesty is an incredible lady. What an icon for the country and one of the the finest women I’ve ever met. “I think she knew me as a little naughty aged 10. I still am a little naughty aged 10. I suppose I always will be, I can’t thank her enough.” read more

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Junior mining sector financings back up to high levels

first_imgAccording to Metals Economics Group (MEG), base metals financings fully recovered in 2010, increasing 72% in dollar volume to $10.4 billion, while gold financings continued to increase from a strong 2009-rising 14% to $12.6 billion. The volume of financings roughly follows the rise and fall of metals prices. As metals prices increased in 2010, so did investor interest, and financings increased both in number and size. Copper prices increased in nine months of 2010 and base metals financing amounts increased in seven. Gold prices increased in nine of the twelve months, and gold financing amounts increased in eight. Financings for the year totaled $23 billion.MEG’s recent Strategic Report reviews junior financings completed from January 2008 to December 2010, including all completed financings of $2 million or more from IPOs, public and private placements, convertible securities, debt, and other sources.Junior financing activity collapsed in the second half of 2008, but the strength of the gold market and the subsequent improvement in copper prices helped the financial markets recover in 2009. Year on year, the dollar value of 2009 base metals financings was down 12%, but gold was up 86% over 2008. Financings jumped sharply from almost $2 billion in November 2010 to about $5.5 billion in December-a record high.In 2010, 27% of gold and base metals financings were directed to Latin American projects, 23% to North America, 21% to Africa, 15% to Oceania, 11% to Asia, and 3% to Europe. In 2009, North America’s percentage was slightly higher than Latin America’s, and African targets received 25% of the total-4% more than in 2010; but overall, the target locations did not change significantly from 2009 to 2010.last_img read more

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SolarKindle protège et recharge votre Kindle

first_imgSolarKindle protège et recharge votre KindleLe Kindle est l’une des liseuses la plus vendue au monde. L’entreprise SolarFocus surfe sur cette vague et propose une house de protections avec panneau solaire pour pouvoir lire plus longtemps. Les liseuses sont connues pour leur très grande autonomie, des milliers de pages sans la moindre recharge. Cette durée n’est toutefois pas infinie, surtout lorsque l’on part en voyage. Étant donné la faible consommation de l’appareil, le solaire apparait une solution très réaliste.Un autre point est la lumière : les liseuses n’en fournissent pas, et il est donc impossible, comme avec du papier, de lire dans le noir. La SolarKindle comporte donc astucieusement une petite lampe, qui se charge également via le solaire.L’appareil comporte également une batterie intégrée, qui recharge celle du Kindle quand celui-ci y est fixé. Bien que SolarFocus n’eut pas confirmé, on peut donc supposer qu’il suffira de laisser sa couverture au soleil pour la charger, en ayant la possibilité de lire avec la liseuse pendant ce temps. On ne sait pas quelle serait la capacité de la batterie de la couverture, SolarFocus a seulement dit que la lampe de poche pouvait fonctionner 50 heures. À lire aussiKobo vs Amazon : comparatifs des liseuses et tablettesUn gros bémol cependant, la bête pèse pas moins de 220 grammes, soit plus que le Kindle lui-même. Elle coute 80 dollars, mais ce n’est pas vraiment plus que les 50 euros habituels des houses Kindle. Elle devrait être disponible rapidement en France. Le 16 janvier 2012 à 12:00 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Destress With Giant StudentMade Rubiks Cube at U of Michigan

first_imgIt’s hard enough to complete a two-inch Rubik’s Cube, let alone a 1,500-pound version.A giant model of Ernõ Rubik’s colorful combination puzzle, installed on the University of Michigan’s North Campus, is believed to be the world’s largest (stationary) working example of the classic toy.Designed and built by two teams of mechanical engineering undergrads over three years, the apparatus stands on the southwest corner of the second floor of the G.G. Brown Building.“Now North Campus has an iconic cube of our own,” co-developer Ryan Kuhn said in a statement, alluding to the spinning Tony Rosenthal sculpture on U-M’s central campus.The idea hit Samuelina Wright on Pi Day 2014; together with Martin Harris, Kelsey Hockstad, and Dan Hiemstra, she worked on the concept for two years, before graduating in 2016.It turns out constructing an enormous Rubik’s Cube isn’t as easy as simply scaling up the traditional trinket. In an effort to minimize friction, engineers used a series of rollers and transfer bearings, making it possible to push and pull each set of blocks.Fine-tuning was then handed off to Kuhn, Jason Hoving, and Doug Nordman, who continued the project to its completion.“This is a truly amazing and unique kinematic mechanism that functions as a Rubik’s Cube,” Noel Perkins, mechanical engineering professor, and student advisor, said.Since its invention in 1974, the 3D puzzle has become the world’s best-selling game, helping to promote mathematical thinking and problem-solving—similar to the U-M task itself.“The project became a fusion of both art and engineering,” according to Wright, who now works at Boeing. “Much like North Campus, the cube’s home.”A larger Rubik’s Cube does exist, but requires the user to “literally roll it on the ground to solve and rotate the faces,” Perkins said.“None of that is required by our stationary design,” he added. “So to be very precise, it is the world’s largest stationary, human-manipulable Rubik’s Cube.”last_img read more

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Cristianos arrival has helped Juve – Szczesny

first_imgJuventus goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny says the arrival of Cristiano Ronaldo from Real Madrid last summer has increased the team’s attacking threat.Since joining Juventus in the summer, Portuguese superstar Cristiano Ronaldo has scored 11 goals in 17 appearances, helping the Bianconeri top the Serie A table with seven points after 17 matches.Szczesny believes that Juve only have to focus on being solid at the back since they have a player like Ronaldo up front.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“I think Cristiano’s arrival has helped the team understand that if we do our job at the back, then something will happen up front,” Szczesny told Football Italia after their narrow 1-0 win against AS Roma.“We’ve got forwards like Cristiano Ronaldo, Mandzukic and Paulo Dybala who we know will create something. Therefore, if we remain solid at the back and don’t concede, we usually emerge with three points.“After all, victory means scoring one more goal than the opposition, so 1-0 is worth the same as winning 7-0. It’s true we have a lot of 1-0 wins, but in my view, that is the perfect football result. I’m a goalkeeper, so I’m happy if we don’t concede!”last_img read more

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Low VIP hold Vietnam headwinds impact Silver Heritage earnings

first_imgAustralian-listed Silver Heritage Group says its October earnings took a hit on the back of bad luck in the VIP segment at Tiger Palace Resort in Nepal and lower than expected earnings at its Vietnam casino, Phoenix International Club.In a trading update filed with the Australian Securities Exchange, Silver Heritage revealed that operations at Phoenix had come in well below budget for the month with GGR of around US$1.5 million compared with the year-to-date average of US$2.49 million. The reduction was blamed on a significant entry fee imposed by the actual owners of the resort and increased competition in the region. Buyer search no longer exclusive as main Silver Heritage candidate misses second deposit deadline Silver Heritage halts preparation of financial statements on a going concern basis as sale looms Load More RelatedPosts Hoiana golf course to welcome first players from 23 September Silver Heritage earns 43% of GGR from Phoenix International Club.The company also took an earnings hit at Tiger Palace, where VIP led to an overall hold rate of 11% versus expectation of 26%.On a more positive note, Silver Heritage said it achieved record monthly GGR at its original Nepal casino, TMCCK in Kathmandu, of US$670,000 of which it holds 100%.The company has also held discussions with the owners of Phoenix International Club in Vietnam which have since led to the removal of the entry fee.“November results to date have shown signs of recovery with results to 28 November already at US$1.9 million,” Silver Heritage said in its update.last_img read more

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Staff at three West Midlands colleges strike in dispute over pay

first_imgUniversity and College Union (UCU) members based at City of Wolverhampton College, Coventry College (pictured) and Warwickshire College Group are undertaking strike action this week in a dispute over pay.Staff who are members of UCU and who work at the City of Wolverhampton College are conducting strike action today (Monday 8 April 2019) and tomorrow (Tuesday 9 April 2019) across the college’s Paget Road, Wellington Road and Bilston Street campuses from 8.00am. The industrial action will continue on Wednesday 10 April 2019, solely at the Bilston Street site.Coventry College UCU members will join picket lines at the college’s Henley and Swanswell Street campuses from 8.00am on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday this week, while those at Warwickshire College Group are starting their 48-hour strike action today, across seven sites, including Evesham College, Royal Lemington Spa College, Rugby College, Pershore College and Warwick Trident College.On Tuesday 9 April 2019, UCU members across Coventry College and Warwickshire College Group will conduct a lunchtime protest and rally in Coventry city centre.The industrial action is a result of college management failing to make an adequate pay offer and neglecting to address key issues, such as excessive workloads, according to UCU. The trade union claims that the pay gap between teaching staff working in colleges versus those based at schools currently stands at £7,000, with college teachers seeing their pay decline by 25% over the past decade.This month’s industrial action follows on from strikes undertaken by six colleges in November 2018; a further 12 colleges completed industrial action in January 2019, and UCU members at five colleges went on strike in March 2019.The majority (92%) of UCU members voted for strike action at Coventry College, while 91% supported industrial action at City of Wolverhampton College and 76% voted in favour of strike action at Warwickshire College Group.UCU has also reported that City of Wolverhampton College has refused an offer from UCU to meet through The Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas).Anne O’Sullivan, regional officer at UCU, said: “Strike action is always a last resort, but if colleges won’t work with us to prioritise staff, then we are left with no other choice. We are particularly frustrated that City of Wolverhampton College turned down our offer to meet through expert mediators to try and avoid strike action.“Colleges [that] engage with us on the pay and conditions of their staff will receive a positive hearing, but those who refuse should not be surprised at the anger of their staff. Pay in further education is a problem, and it is time for colleges to get serious and do something about it.”A spokesperson at Warwickshire College Group added: “We are aware that a small number of our staff are taking industrial action [on Monday 8 April] tomorrow Tuesday 9 April. This strike is fundamentally part of a national pay dispute with the University and College Union seeking a 5% annual pay award in 2018-2019 for staff working in colleges. “It is widely acknowledged that the government needs to increase the level of funding in colleges to enable colleges to continue to provide first class technical education and to afford to reward the hardworking staff through annual pay awards. Warwickshire College Group has gifted all staff some additional holiday days this year as a step to reward their contribution, while at the same time ensuring further financial pressures are not created through increasing pay costs. “We hope the funding situation for colleges changes in the near future. [While] we recognise the right for UCU to take industrial action it is always disappointing when our students’ learning is interrupted by such action. At Warwickshire College Group, our priority is the welfare of our staff and students, and therefore I can confirm that we will remain open during this period of industrial action. We expect to continue to deliver the highest standards of education for our students with minimal disruption.”    City of Wolverhampton College and Coventry College were unavailable for comment at the time of publication.last_img read more

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WrestleMania is upon us

first_img Share your voice Your browser does not support the audio element. 2:27 Netpicks Cord Cutters (OTT) Now playing: Watch this: Comment Tags For more information on what’s available to watch online, check out CNET.com/Netpicks or subscribe to the podcast — it’s free! And go to TVGuide.com to see what else is out in the world of streaming.center_img 1 TV and Movies Home Entertainment It’s Kofi’s time. WWE Welcome back to your guide to finding out what’s new online. Every week, we put together a podcast that lets you know what’s been added to services like Netflix, Hulu and HBO Now. The audio is about a minute or two long.Since you’re reading this, let’s give you some extra information not found in the podcast: Hulu’s picked up A Quiet Place. Do you know what makes this movie hard to watch? Eating nachos or popcorn. Crunchiness kind of messes with the vibe. That’s a movie tip from your buddy, Iyaz. Want to know what else is new? (Including everything you need to know about Wrestlemania?) Listen to this guy: WWE, HBO and the Tick for the weekend Amazon Prime HBO Amazon Hulu Netflix Audio (weekly): RSS | iTunes | Google PlayVideo (monthly): iTunes (HD) | iTunes (HQ) | iTunes (SD) | RSS (HD) | RSS (HQ)| RSS (SD) What’s new to stream in April 2019last_img read more

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PBS says new Apple privacy rules could hurt its kids app

first_img reading • Apple’s restrictions on kids apps will hurt PBS, the broadcaster says Tags Comment PBS CEO Paula Kerger: “We’re not selling stuff to kids.” Sarah Tew/CNET The US Public Broadcasting Service faces challenges beyond the Trump administration’s efforts to defund it. Paula Kerger, CEO of the nonprofit broadcaster, says PBS has now encountered an obstacle from Apple.Kerger said Tuesday that a new restriction from the iPhone maker will limit how PBS can work with third-party developers and will ultimately harm the PBS Kids app. She made the remarks during a Recode conference in Arizona.Apple plans to limit third-party tracking in apps listed under the kids category in the App Store. The decision, which goes into effect Sept. 3, is meant to protect younger users. But Kerger said PBS uses the data to make its apps more effective as educational tools, she said. “We’re not selling stuff to kids,” said Kerger. 1 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Facebook Apple See All •center_img If Apple’s new guidelines kick in as planned, Kerger said, PBS Kids will have to be taken down.”We have millions of kids that are using our apps, so it’s a challenge,” Kerger said. PBS is talking to Apple about the restrictions. PBS and Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.PBS encountered similar issues with Facebook and Google prior to Apple’s rule changes, according to Kerger. In 2018 as part of an effort to fight propaganda, Google-owned YouTube proposed labeling content from broadcasters that receive government funding. Critics said the move could set PBS alongside networks like Russia’s RT. A PBS spokesman said at the time that the policy “could wrongly imply that the government has influence over PBS content, which is prohibited by statute.”Kerger said PBS has also had trouble with Facebook. The social media site labeled the broadcasting company’s content as political ads. PBS had to remove the content, and it took nine months for the issue to be resolved, she said. YouTube and Facebook didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. “We love working with all these platforms,” Kerger said. “It gives us amazing reach. Talk to us. Sit down and talk to us.”In addition to the new rules against third-party tracking in apps, Apple is also doubling down on iOS parenting apps. Apple said the decision to remove parental control apps was for security reasons.Originally published June 13, 8:50 a.m. PT.Updates, 11:13 a.m., 1:36 p.m.: More background details included. Share your voice Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mobile Culture Mobile Apps Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Applelast_img read more

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