Borneo study explores links between farm expansion and deforestation

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Species, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Haze, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Slash-and-burn, Southeast Asia Haze, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Banner image: A baby orangutan. Orangutans are listed as Critically Endangered and on the brink of extinction as their habitats are destroyed by expansion of industrial plantations in Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. A nearly two-decade study of land-cover change in Borneo has identified a positive correlation between the loss of forests and the expansion of plantations, primarily for oil palms.The findings undermine the long-held position of industry and government representatives that plantation expansion doesn’t contribute to deforestation and that it makes use of already cleared land.The study also highlighted a slowdown in rates of both deforestation and plantation expansion, which the researchers attributed to declining process of crude palm oil, more stringent regulations on forest clearing, and wetter weather in 2017.While the expansion of plantations hit a new low in 2017, activists say the possible illegal clearing of peat forests continues unabated in Indonesian Borneo, despite repeated calls to the government for action. JAKARTA — A slowdown in both the expansion of industrial plantations and forest loss across Borneo in 2017 provides strong evidence of a correlation between the two.The findings are laid out in a new study by scientists at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), who used time-series satellite images to quantify forest loss, industrial plantation expansion and their overlap each year from 2000 to 2017 in Borneo. The island, home to half of the world’s oil palm plantations, is shared by Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei, but the study omitted the latter because of its negligible area of industrial plantations.The area of forest lost in the region studied amounted to 2,500 square kilometers (970 square miles) in 2017 — a sharp decline from the 2016 peak of 6,100 square kilometers (2,360 square miles).Also in 2017, industrial plantations expanded by 1,100 square kilometers (425 square miles) in Indonesian Borneo, also known as Kalimantan, and by 500 square kilometers (190 square miles) in Malaysian Borneo. These figures were markedly down from highs of 7,000 square kilometers (2,700 square miles) in Kalimantan in 2009, and 6,000 square kilometers (2,320 square miles) in Malaysian Borneo in 2012.CIFOR’s estimate of the total area of old-growth forest lost in Kalimantan and Malaysian Borneo from 2000 to 2017 is 60,400 square kilometers (23,320 square miles). The figure is strikingly close to the 62,000 square kilometers (23,940 square miles) of total industrial plantations in the region as of 2017, 88 percent of which are dedicated to oil palms.Timelapse of Borneo deforestation 2000-2017. Green to white= forest loss, green to black= forest cleared and converted to plantations in the same year, green to blue= forest permanently flooded by hydropower dams. Image by David Gaveau/CIFOR.Positive correlation“Every year since 2000 until 2017, we measured total forest loss, how much plantation area was added, and how much forest was cleared and converted to plantations in the same year,” CIFOR researcher and study lead author David Gaveau said. “This allows us to determine how much forest is being cleared by plantation companies.”The linked rise and fall in the rates of deforestation and plantation expansion point to a strong pattern, Gaveau said. “[M]any companies have stopped expanding the size of their plantations, and therefore they have been clearing and converting less and less forest since 2013 until 2017,” he said.Douglas Sheil of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, one of the study’s co-authors, said it was clear that “not all plantation developments caused conversion of forests to plantations,” because some of the plantations were established on areas that had already been cleared.This is an argument that various industry and government representatives have seized on to insist that the growth of plantations doesn’t contribute to deforestation, and to claim that expanding plantations is a reasonable use of already deforested land.However, the study found a positive correlation between industrial plantation expansion and forest loss in Borneo.About half of the old-growth forests that were cleared were ultimately converted to industrial plantations. The overwhelming majority of these, 92 percent, were converted within a year of being cleared, according to the study.“Expansion of industrial plantations has directly contributed to forest loss throughout the study period as seen in the areas of forest cleared and converted within the same year,” the study says.This correlation is particularly marked in Malaysian Borneo, where 58 percent of total deforestation since 2000 resulted in plantations within a year, compared to 38 percent in Kalimantan.“Because a time lag of less than one year between forest loss and plantation establishment is short, a company must have razed the forest before planting,” Gaveau said.Rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerFactors for slowdownThe study’s authors cited various factors for the recent slowdown in plantation expansion and deforestation, including a persistent decline in crude palm oil (CPO) prices.“The strong correlation between CPO prices and plantation expansion indicates that declining CPO prices since 2011 are the likely major cause behind declining expansion of plantations and associated conversion to plantations deforestation,” Gaveau said.He added that they could not rule out possible impacts from Indonesian initiatives to regulate expansion of plantations into forests. These include a moratorium on clearing peatlands, fire prevention measures, and no-deforestation commitments made by plantation companies and their clients.The study also noted that 2017 was a non-El Niño year, resulting in wetter conditions with fewer fires — a major cause of forest loss in 2015 and 2016.All these factors combined to contribute to the decline in forest loss in 2017.But the researchers say there’s still much to be done to ensure the remaining forests in Borneo are protected from the expansion of industrial plantations.“Fires and industrial plantations continue to cause deforestation, and we see no sign that plantation developments are seeking to avoid forest conversions,” the study says.Safrudin Mahendra, executive director of the NGO Save Our Borneo (SOB), welcomed the findings of slowing deforestation and plantation expansion rates, but said they shouldn’t be seen as a sign that plantation companies were committed to reining in their operations.“It’s not because the companies are getting less ambitious about clearing forests,” he said. “It’s because the available land in Borneo is getting scarcer.”Gaveau said scarcity of land and workers, as well as investments shifting to other regions, including Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua, might also have played a role in the slowing of plantation expansion in Borneo.However, he discounted a theory that companies didn’t need to clear as much land in 2017 after devastating fires in 2015 razed huge swaths of primary and peat forest. He said there was no correlation between the two, and the slowdown in plantation expansion began after 2012, well before the 2015 fires.Gaveau added that while the land cleared by those fires might potentially be converted into plantations in the future, the research hadn’t found an increase in plantation expansion on such already-cleared lands in 2016 and in 2017. “Instead, we continue to find a steady downward trend in 2016 and in 2017,” he said.Peatland deforestation to make way for a palm oil plantation in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia. Photo credit: Glenn Hurowtiz.Case studyA recent case of peat forest being cleared for a palm oil plantation has been reported by activists in Indonesia’s Central Kalimantan province.Safrudin from the SOB said locals had complained of fires in a peat swamp in the district of West Kotawaringin last year. Activists surveying the site last October reported seeing heavy equipment being used to clear the area. They reported their findings to the authorities, including the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, the presidentially appointed Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG), and the provincial government and police department.Only the BRG responded, Safrudin said. The agency sent investigators to the field with the SOB activists, where they found an extensive network of canals had been dug to drain the peat swamp.The BRG officials also found an orangutan nest in the area, which the province’s conservation agency has identified as a habitat for the critically endangered Borneo orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus). Upon further checking, the BRG and the activists found no evidence that the Ministry of Environment and Forestry had issued a permit allowing the forest in question to be converted for a plantation.Safrudin said he suspected that the company behind the clearing had employed local farmers to do the grunt work. “Once the peat clearing was discovered, the company could easily use that to apply for a forest conversion permit,” he said. “They could argue that the forest had already been cleared by locals and thus could be converted.” (Safrudin declined to name the company, saying he hadn’t been able to verify the allegation.)He said the BRG had asked the Ministry of Environment and Forestry in December to follow up on the findings, but there’s been no response to date. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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KIT Ends 2-Week Intensive Training on Human Resource Management

first_imgThree representatives from the Netherlands-based Royal Tropical Institute (KIT) have conducted a 2-week training in human resource management for over 15 health practitioners from several institutions in the country.At the request of authorities of the Tubman National Institute of Medical Arts (TNIMA) and the Liberia Board for Nursing and Midwifery (LBNM), Dr. Prisca Zwanikken, Dr. Barend Gerretsen and Dinu Abdella were sent by the Institute to train Liberian health managers, instructors, midwives and nurses in human resource (HR) management.Speaking with our Health Reporter at the close of the training over the weekend, Dr. Zwanikken, lead facilitator, said that given the shortage of health workers in Liberia, it is important that the remaining ones on the ground are adequately trained to manage available resources.“So we came to help our friends in Liberia learn that,” Dr. Zwanikken added. The KIT facilitators began their 2-week lectures with ‘Norms and Values’ because given the situation, it is very important that those in the training got to know them as they are HR yardsticks to live by.According to Dr. Zwanikken, they also discussed the performance of health workers, how many of them are being trained and their productivity based on their job descriptions. She stated that during the lectures, they discovered that most of the health workers have no job descriptions or they just didn’t ask for one. She stated that the lectures included performance appraisal for health workers and providing constructive feedback and motivational talks.The KIT professor said some of the challenges they noticed among the participants before beginning the training, were that the participants knew “a little bit about human resources but they did not know for example that a regular performance appraisal or job descriptions are important. They also said many of our nurses are leaving and we don’t know what to do to retain them.”Dr. Zwanikken said that she and her colleagues along with two Liberian facilitators, Mrs. Cecelia C.K. Flomo, Registrar, LBNM and Ms. Munah Tarpeh, Deputy Administrator, JFK Hospital, practiced a number of skills with the participants to help them learn how to solve such problems, including why the nurses are leaving. “In trying to solve this particular problem and others, we asked them how they would analyze a problem like why someone is leaving.”She, however, said that one way to find a solution to the problem is to discuss it as a team with every team member providing inputs. According to her, this helps to strengthen the institution and staffs are retained and at the same time other related problems are solved.According to the KIT professor, her Liberian students were very enthusiastic to learn as they were always seated ahead of time.“They were always seated and reading the materials before we came in. They were asking relevant questions even before the sessions could start. That was wonderful to see,” she stated.She hoped that those Liberians who have been trained and even those who have traveled to the Netherlands for studies will continue to implement what they had learned. “We hope that they will be agents of change, by changing their situations at their work places and thereby extend their knowledge and skills to others. It will lead to the improvement of the health service delivery for those women and children, who can’t get access to healthcare services at the moment.”She disclosed to our Health Correspondent that the Ministry of Health had asked KIT to also conduct a 2-week course, which will focus on analyzing health systems in disruptive environments.During the formal closing program, two of the participants, a male and a female, demonstrated one of the skills they learned about how to bring a human resource problem to the attention of and solve it amicably with higher authorities.Speaking at the close of the training, the head of Nursing at the Health Ministry stated that there are a lot of constraints in the public sector and urged the participants to help resolve them using what they have learned during the two week training. “As a manager, you have to find a way to help motivate your subordinates and develop a strategy to retain your staff.” She used the occasion to plead with those awarding scholarships to also look at awarding scholarships to older folks too, and not the younger ones only.The Coordinator, Evaluation Research and Health Statistics at the Health Ministry, Mr. Luke Barwo, stated: “We feel that the 2-week human resource management course that you went through is very important. We know some of the problems the country faces when it comes to HR management.”Mr. Barwo cited migration from rural to urban settings as one of the problems that is noticeable. He also stated that motivation was one thing lacking. He added that it is high time that rethinking is brought to the work environment so that everyone feels a part of the work place.Also making remarks, Rep. Johnson Toe Chea, a member of the House of Representatives Committee on Health and Social Welfare, stated that building a resilient health system in Liberia will depend on three things, including manpower and material availability.He told the KIT facilitators that there are many challenges including poor human resources in the country. He, however, pleaded with them to also include others in their training package and urged the trainees to put into practice what they learned.The training was also intended to improve the Human Resource Management (HRM) service delivery system of post-Ebola Liberia for health managers. The training was done in two phases. Phase one was from October 2 to 9 and Phase two was from November 30 to December 4. It was funded by the Netherlands government through the Nuffic, the Netherlands organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education.Speaking on behalf of all the trainees, a representative stated: “Whatsoever we have learned will be demonstrated through our actions at our various places of work. We are going work on all those low hanging fruits within our reach and will engage positively with those in higher authority on the fruits that our hands cannot reach.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Ex sues actor Morales in sexual assault

first_imgActor Esai Morales was sued by a former live-in girlfriend who alleges he sexually assaulted her, leaving her with herpes, court papers obtained today show. Elizabeth Mazzocchi filed the lawsuit yesterday in Los Angeles Superior Court, alleging intentional and negligent transmission of a sexually transmitted disease, assault, battery and breach of oral contract. A representative of Morales, 44, was not immediately available for comment. He has had roles in such movies as “Bad Boys” and “La Bamba” and played Lt. Tony Rodriguez in “NYPD Blue.” Mazzocchi’s lawyer, Gloria Allred, also declined to comment on the case. According to the suit, Morales knew he had herpes and never told Mazzocchi, leaving her with “an incurable disease that will have associated medical expenses, pain and discomfort for the rest of her life.” Morales and Mazzocchi began their relationship in January 2006 and he moved into her Los Angeles home two months later, the lawsuit states. In addition, Mazzocchi began managing Morales’ career, giving up other opportunities to “improve his career” because she “was in love with defendant.” But in April 2006, Morales began a “systematic pattern of abuse against (Mazzocchi), including a forcible rape in May 2006, the lawsuit states. Morales told Mazzocchi that if she ever called the police he would have “every gangbanger in town looking to kill (her),” the suit states. Despite the alleged threat, Mazzocchi called 9-1-1 when Morales allegedly kicked and punched her in November 2006, the lawsuit states. Mazzocchi also claims Morales has not paid $25,000 he owes her for management services.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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High court won’t hear Allred case

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John PhillipsAllred’s lawyers, including constitutional lawyer Erwin Chemerinsky, say judges increasingly are engaging in prior restraint of free-speech rights in important cases. WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Monday refused to step into a First Amendment issue involving Gloria Allred, a prominent California lawyer who was the subject of a judge’s gag order in a high-profile murder case that is now over. Allred, an outspoken television personality, represented a teenage girl who testified at the trial of Scott Dyleski, now 17. Dyleski was sentenced last week to life in prison without parole for the killing of Pamela Vitale, the wife of television legal analyst Daniel Horowitz. Allred’s client, Jena Reddy, is Dyleski’s ex-girlfriend. She told the jury that while Dyleski never admitted or denied killing his neighbor, he told her he would take the blame to protect her and his best friend. Reddy also testified that hours after Vitale was slain, Dyleski told friends it would take at least three dozen blows to bludgeon someone and it would likely be a slow, painful death. Late last year, amid intense media attention, a Superior Court judge in Contra Costa County, issued a gag order aimed at attorneys for witnesses in the case, as well as police, prosecutors and defense lawyers. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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West Ham v Tottenham: Harry Kane ready to hand out capital punishment in derby

first_imgHarry Kane has scored five of Tottenham’s last nine goals against West Ham and looks primed to put the Hammers to the sword again this weekend. Unibet have crunched the Opta stats to come up with some interesting predictions ahead of the London Stadium showdown.West Ham have beaten Tottenham more times (14) than they have any other club in the Premier LeagueWest Ham’s Premier League record against Tottenham is middling at best. It reads W14 D8 L20. Yet at home the Hammers have enjoyed plenty of success, with 10 victories from 21 previous clashes. Last term they edged Spurs 1-0 at the London Stadium — just one of seven league victories at their new home. The Hammers finally got up and running last week with a 1-0 win over Huddersfield at London Stadium. They’ve since backed that up with a 0-0 draw at West Brom and Tuesday’s 3-0 League Cup result over Bolton. Suddenly things are looking bright for manager Slaven Bilic.West Ham to win/draw is 7/5Tottenham are looking to win their opening three away games of a league season for the first time since the 1991/92 campaignTottenham, like West Ham last year, are settling into a new stadium this term and Wembley has not been kind to them. They are yet to win there in the league (D2 L1), while away from home Spurs have been excellent. A 2-0 result at Newcastle on the opening day of the season was followed by a 3-0 victory at Everton. Playing away, against home teams that are expected to come forward, aids Spurs’ attacking game, as Harry Kane has more space to muscle his way around. The last time Spurs opened a league season with three away wins was in 1991 when they turned over Southampton, Nottingham Forest and Norwich.Spurs to win is 3/5Harry Kane has scored five goals in his last five Premier League appearances against West HamHarry Kane has enjoyed September. He boasts six goals for club and country after drawing a blank in August. And this weekend he comes up against a side where finding the net is becoming his forte. Kane has scored braces in two of his last five appearances against West Ham. During that period, his five goals in total have earned Spurs seven points. Yet all five of those goals have come at home. Kane is yet to score an away goal at West Ham and the Hammers beat their London rivals 1-0 at home both last season and the campaign before that. Kane may therefore be Spurs’ best avenue to three points on Saturday.Kane to score and Spurs win at 29/20Manuel Lanzini has scored three of West Ham’s last five games against Spurs but misses Saturday’s match through injuryWest Ham have struggled for goals this season and in recent years against Spurs, have rarely romped to victory. It’s been eight games since the Hammers last put three or more past Spurs and Saturday is unlikely to witness any change to that. Lanzini scored eight times for West Ham last season and without him they certainly look blunted going forward. The Hammers have scored in just two of their five league games so far and come up against a Spurs side that have conceded just once in their last four across all competitions.West Ham not to score at 29/20Pablo Zabaleta is joint-top with Crystal Palace’s Jason Puncheon for the most yellow cards (4) after five Premier League gamesPablo Zabaleta arrived at West Ham on a free transfer from Manchester City this summer as Pep Guardiola instigated a squad clear-out. The Argentine was drafted in to Slaven Bilic’s side to provide competition for Sam Byram at right-back. But Byram appears to be dramatically fading from Bilic’s plans and the former Leeds United star has barely got a look in. Instead, the Hammers are coping with an ageing Zabaleta at full-back. The 32-year-old has been booked in four of his five appearances this season but this is not because West Ham are playing dirty. Angelo Ogbonna (1) is the only other Hammers defender to receive a caution so far, highlighting just how off the pace Zabaleta is.Zabaleta to get booked 7/4 1 Kane has scored five of his side’s last nine goals against the Hammers last_img read more

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High Court to decide who will pay for large Garda operation at ‘The Kube’

first_imgThe High Court will decide this Friday who will pay for a large Garda operation around a Letterkenny building known as The Kube.Up to 70 Gardai were involved in an early morning operation on Monday yesterday to secure the building at Thorn Road, allegedly illegally occupied since last month.Gardaí only found three people inside the building when they arrived at 5am but another 40 or 50 people later arrived, Mr Justice Tony O’Connor was told. The Irish Times has reported the others did not enter the building and the situation was quite tense for a few minutes but order eventually prevailed and the crowd dissipated, Anthony McBride BL told the judge.Mr McBride was appearing on behalf of the Garda Commissioner, following a request from the judge for him to be informed of any difficulties gardaí would have in executing orders directing the protestors inside the building to leave immediately.The occupation began on November 18th when around 20 people stormed the building and told Donegal County Council staff – housed on the second floor – to leave before changing the locks.Among them was local businessman Brendan Gildea, who had leased out the building before it was taken over by a receiver appointed by Danske Bank which was owed millions by Mr Gildea’s company, the court heard. Mr Gildea, it is alleged, demanded the council sign a new lease with him before the occupation would end.The receiver got High Court orders against Mr Gildea and Noel Devine – requiring them to leave immediately. The orders also applied to anyone else with knowledge of them.Mr McBride said 70 gardaí, some from as far away as Roscommon, were deployed in the operation to secure possession of the building.There were three people inside who, after the court order was read to them, left, counsel said.Council staff, including its water testing service, who had been out of their offices since the occupation began, have returned.Gardaí cannot be expected to remain on the premises but the local chief superintendent advised she was prepared to give advice and assistance to the receiver, Martin Ferris, to enable him secure it, Mr McBride said. Mr McBride said significant public funds had been expended in this operation to secure a private premises.Just as gardaí are reimbursed for providing security at public events such as concerts, the commissioner wished to apply to recover those costs from the receiver.John Gleeson SC, with John Kennedy BL, for the receiver, said that application could be heard later this week when the court could be updated on efforts by gardaí to arrest Noel Devine for alleged contempt of the court orders.Mr Devine was believed to be in Northern Ireland, the court heard. Mr Gleeson said apart from damage to a window in the building, files and computers were dislodged and gardaí may have to treat this as criminal damage.Mr Justice O’Connor welcomed that the building had been got back and the assurance gardaí would assist the receiver with advice in securing it from now on.He will hear submissions on Friday on the commissioner’s bid to have the costs of the Garda operation paid by the receiver.High Court to decide who will pay for large Garda operation at ‘The Kube’ was last modified: December 13th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Tomorrow’s Hope: Nic Haralambous

first_imgFounder: SA RocksWhy is Nicholas Tomorrow’s Hope?It’s rare to find someone who is so passionate about something that, even after a full day’s work, they are willing to invest a good few hours more to seeing that passion grow.Lucky for us, Nic’s passion just happens to be this wonderful country we all live in, and his mission in life to use his technical skills and resources to make sure that everyone knows about it.Eighteen months ago, he was just an IT guy frustrated with reading scathing blogs from South Africans living abroad. But instead of just venting over the water cooler with some of his mates who might feel the same, Nic channeled his frustration into a blog – SA Rocks – which actively seeks to find one positive thing about South Africa 7 days a week, 365 days a year.It’s obvious that Nic is part of a new generation of active citizens who are using technology to mobilize people to shift their mindsets and reassess their attitudes and behaviours.So you might not find Nic serving up soup to the homeless at 6am, because it’s just not his style. But what you will find him doing, every day of the year, is slaving over a hot laptop in order to serve us with positive news about our fabulous country.In his own words .“Technology is an incredibly mobilising medium. Instead of going out and mobilising 10 people to help a charity, I’m mobilising 20 000 every month to believe in the same thing, and that mind shift I believe is mobilising.”Fast FactsNic has blogged every day for the past 18 months and never fallen short of a positive point about SA to share.Nic works full-time for The Mail and Guardian.Nic blogs every day of the year for about 2-3 hours.SA Rocks was runner-up for SA Weblog of the Year at the SA Blog Awards 2008.Eighteen months ago, SA Rocks averaged 1 000 monthly visitors. Today it attracts on average 20 000 visitors a month.Where can I learn more?To find out more about Nic and his mission in life, visit SA RocksStory published on SAinfo on 22 August 2008.Source: Brand South Africalast_img read more

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South Africa is ‘Country of the Future’

first_imgNew Mercedes Benz cars await export on the docks of the harbour in East London in the Eastern Cape. (Image: Media Club South Africa) MEDIA CONTACTS • Manelisi Wolela Media Liaison Officer Department of Economic Development +27 71 313 4192 RELATED ARTICLES • Team SA to call for investment • Africa rising • African integration on Brics agendaLucille DavieSouth Africa has been named African Country of the Future 2013/14 by fDi Magazine, a London Financial Times publication.“A worthy winner, South Africa has consistently outperformed its African neighbours in FDI [foreign direct investment] attraction since fDi Markets records began in 2003,” says the magazine in its August/September edition. South Africa has the continent’s biggest economy, with gross domestic product (GDP) at $5,8-billion or R3-trillion.Morocco is ranked second for FDI, with Mauritius in third position, followed by Egypt, Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, Botswana, Tunisia and Namibia. South Africa also took the top prize in two other categories: best economic potential, and best business friendliness. “The South African economy has grown since 1994 almost exactly at the average for middle-income economies excluding China – and three times as fast as in the 1980s,” writes Neva Makgetla, the deputy director-general in the Department of Economic Development, in the Sunday Times of 20 October.Kenya has done particularly well, climbing from 10th position in 2011/12 to fifth position this year. It is an innovative country that strives to diversify its economy. Its use of M-Pesa mobile phone payments, for example, have encouraged new investment opportunities.Attracting investmentThe magazine indicates that South Africa attracts about a fifth of all FDI into Africa, more than double the second biggest FDI destination, Morocco. In 2012, that amounted to $4.6-billion, with almost 14 000 jobs created. Johannesburg, the commercial heart of the country, in Gauteng, was the top FDI destination on the continent in 2012.According to fDi Markets, this means that South Africa now ranks as the 16th top FDI destination country in the world. Since the global economic crisis of 2008, FDI globally has dropped 20%. In 2012, the figure improved slightly, settling around 14.3%. Seen against this background, Africa has fared better than other world regions, with FDI on the continent only down 7.9% in 2012. However, in the first five months of 2013, FDI in Africa fell, levelling out at about the same as global averages, down 27%, compared to 28% for the rest of the world.“Unrest, corruption and severe income disparities persist in Africa, though an emerging middle class with increased disposable income, a marked improvement in governance and the availability of natural resources present an attractive opportunity for investors,” indicates the report. “Despite a slight decline of 3.9% in 2012, South Africa increased its market share of global FDI, which further increased in the first five months of 2013 as the country attracted 1.37% of global greenfield investment projects.”In addition, South Africa has attracted more research and development investment than any other African country, the magazine points out, and it accounts for the largest number of patents registered on the continent.According to a recent report by the African Development Bank, Africa’s economy is growing faster than that of any other continent. Of the 54 African countries, almost half, or 26, have now achieved middle-income status, with countries like South Africa, Morocco and Mauritius leading the pack.Gauteng province contributes 40% of the country’s GDP, with Joburg at its heart. The city is the top destination for FDI in Africa, and in the first five months of 2013, was one of five African cities that attracted more investment compared to the same period of 2012. “South Africa has sustained democracy for close to 20 years and with it higher growth rates, solid employment creation and improvement in social and economic services for most people,” says Makgetla. She stresses that with democracy comes a commitment to real, if gradual, change. And it is only if the country lives up to that commitment, that it will establish a “positive investment climate or a cohesive and peaceful society”.Brics partnersIn 2012, FDI in South Africa fell just 3.9% compared to its Brics partners of Brazil, Russia, India and China, which experienced an average 20.7% decline.In its submission for fDi Magazine’s report, Trade and Investment South Africa stressed the importance of the country’s attachments to its Brics partners. “South Africa’s participation in the Brics grouping is significant… as it provides important opportunities to build South Africa’s domestic manufacturing base, enhance value-added exports, promote technology sharing, support small business development and expand trade and investment opportunities.”Nigeria and Botswana are the new entrants in the magazine’s top 10, ranking in seventh and eighth place respectively. Africa has experienced significant growth in the past decade. However, this must be viewed against the fact that its countries are expanding off a low base, with living standards and business environments taking longer to catch up to world standards.“Yet this represents an opportunity for future growth. If the region continues in its efforts to tackle poverty, corruption, inadequate infrastructures and political issues, Africa’s competitiveness on a global scale can only get better,” reads the report.last_img read more

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Morning Coffee Notes – Converse with us

first_imgTags:#web#Web 2.0 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market richard macmanus Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Good, Dave Winer has returned to text format (at least for today) for his morning coffee notes. That means I can link to it. He wrote this morning:“Every company, not just tech companies, needs to have a presence in the blogging world, someone whose feet are planted both in the network outside the organization as well as inside. […] Only Microsoft and perhaps Yahoo have this. Even Google can’t be accessed over the web, and definitely not Apple.”It’s Monday morning as I write this and I’ve just had my coffee, so here are my notes on this matter. Microsoft and Yahoo both have a large presence in the blogosphere – indeed over the past year or so I’ve gotten to personally know many people from both companies. I have a particular affinity to Yahoo, perhaps because it’s an excellent mix of New Media and Web Technology. Anyway, my point is that as I’ve gotten to know people from Yahoo and Microsoft, those companies have become much more ‘human’ to me. We have conversations on the Web and offline too. Everybody benefits in some way – e.g. they get ideas and feedback from their users, we get new products that better suit our needs. It’s a very symbiotic relationship.Compare that to Google. As of this date I don’t know a single person from Google. I hope at least some of them read my blog, but not one has ever emailed me or commented on my blog or linked to me. Ordinarily I wouldn’t expect any of those things, but when you consider how much attention (that word again) I’ve gotten from Yahoo and Microsoft people via my blog – well, one begins to wonder where all the Google bloggers are. Maybe I can start the conversation with Google folks by extending a simple invitation – ping me at readwriteweb AT gmail.com (see I use your products!). Let me know what’s happening inside Google, what you’re thinking about. I’m sure we have a lot in common. Converse with me – and other bloggers like me. You may be surprised to find that we can help each other.And lest I be seen to be picking on (or sucking up to) Google, I extend that invitation to ANY and ALL Web 2.0 companies. Join the blogosphere. Talk with your users, find out what makes us tick. Because it works both ways – we also find out what makes YOU tick and so we better understand each other.Thus endth this sermon from The Father of Web 2.0.last_img read more

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